New recipes

Fall Restaurant Preview 2011

Fall Restaurant Preview 2011


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Dozens of restaurants open around the country every season. What makes one more exciting than another? Track record, for one. When a restaurateur like Stephen Starr announces that he's launching a new venture (like he will this fall with Il Pittore in Philadelphia and Caffè Storico in New York City) the news carries certain expecations. But there are plenty of other things that go into raising new openings across the country to the top of your must-go list.

More fodder for the hype machine? A great underdog story. Nothing highlights the American dream better than a young chef stepping out from his mentor to open his own place — entering the fickle realm of the restaurant industry for the first time. Even better, there's the story of the veteran chef making a triumphant return after some bad breaks, as Govind Armstrong surely hopes to do with Post and Beam next month.

There are also restaurants that garner anticipation because of far less calculated factors. Take for instance, the eatery helmed by a chef who found her way into America's heart due to an appearance on TV. You'd think Tiffani Faison's appearances on Top Chef will draw customers to her new Boston barbecue joint.

Sometimes restaurants have concepts so revolutionary that diners can't help but be drawn to them, like that of Next in Chicago, which allows Grant Achatz to reimagine his restaurant every season. Not every restaurant can expect to burn so brightly, but in looking at the most notable restaurants opening this fall several trends emerged.

Check out the most country's most anticipated fall restaurant openings categorized below by Eat/Dine editors Molly Aronica and Arthur Bovino.

Burgers and Butchery
Burger bars have been hot for a while, and it looks like the trend is not slowing — from Nancy Silverton opening a Shack-style joint in LA to Cathal Armstrong slinging patties in his new place. In a similar vein, restaurants serving up meats butchered and cured in-house are everywhere, such as at Paul Kahan's new Publican Quality Meats.

• District Commons, Washington, D.C.: With Acadiana, TenPenh, Ceiba, and DC Coast under his belt, chef Jeff Tunks has been around D.C. a long time. But this foray into D.C.’s burgeoning burger scene will be his first attempt at counter service. Expect burgers made with wet-aged, whole chuck roasts and brisket, ground in-house (a 3:1 ratio). (Photo courtesy of Facebook/District Commons)

• Society Fair, Washington, D.C.: The food hall trend continues to spread. This one, by star D.C. chef Cathal Armstrong and his wife Meshelle will be a "European-style" food market near Howard University that combines a "butchery, bakery, wine bar, and restaurant with 30 outdoor seats and 50 indoor seats."

• Publican Quality Meats, Chicago: An artisan, full-service butcher shop by Paul Kahan that will source meats from local family farms. There will be housemade charcuterie and bread, made-to-order sandwiches for lunch, and down the road, continental-style breakfast at this spot across the street from The Publican.

• Nellcôte, Chicago: Pastas, pizzas, small plates, bachelor’s jam (an intense rum and fruit drink), and dishes made in a wood-burning oven. It’s been said that Jared Van Camp (Old Town Social) sees this project as his coming out party, a way to show he can do more than just great bar food.

• Bavette’s Bar and Boeuf, Chicago: Brendan Sodikoff's (Gilt Bar, Maude's Liquor Bar, The Doughnut Vault) “European steakhouse” concept in River North includes a burger joint at the back of it.

• HD1, Atlanta: Three Flip Burgers, now a hot dog joint. You have to wonder if Richard Blais ever plans to open a real restaurant ever again. Muse over that while sampling the menu, which includes house-ground meats and sausages. Eater Atlanta noted that the chef’s own favorites are: “chicken wings with lemon curd and Szechuan pepper, waffle fries with maple-soy, crispy hominy with chile and lime, fennel sausage with San Marzano ketchup, lamb sausage with cranberry and cucumber, fried chicken livers, and the crawfish roll with shrimp head aioli.”


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Monday Profile: Starkville native provides ingredients, Asian recipes at family-owned market and restaurant

When the first wave of COVID-19 panic buying swept through Starkville about a month ago, there was no run on toilet paper at Asian Foods Market on Highway 12.

Asian Foods Market sells a little of most everything and a lot of some things, but no toilet paper.

That doesn’t mean the family-owned business was immune to panic buying.

“For us, it was rice,” said Kevin Yang, whose parents opened the store in 2011 and added a restaurant next door two years ago. “Lots of rice. About two weeks after spring break, everybody started hoarding rice all at the same time.”

The variety of rice, often called “sticky rice,” is sweeter and stickier than the conventional white rice typically consumed by non-Asians in the U.S. While that “American” rice is usually sold in one or two-pound packages, the rice Asian Market sells comes in a single size — 50-pound bags.

“In most Asian cultures, rice is the basis of just about every meal,” Yang said. “I don’t even know what you would compare it to in American food, maybe milk? All I know is that rice is something every Asian household has stocked.”

You might think a 50-pound bag of rice would go a long way. Not so, Yang said.

“At the start of all this, we sold a pallet of rice in one day,” Yang said. “That’s 60 50-pound bags of rice. People would come in, buy two bags and then come the next day and buy two more. It was crazy.”

Yang, 22, is the first native-born American in his family. His parents immigrated to the U.S. from China in the mid-1980s, settling in Brooklyn, New York.

The family moved to Starkville when Yang was 2, buying the old Taste of China Restaurant before later shifting the focus to a market, something the family felt filled a void in the market where Mississippi State’s large Asian student population has started to grow.

“A lot of our business comes from Mississippi State,” Yang said. “Our store is about the only place they can find many of the things you need in Asian cooking. We filled a niche and we’ve grown our business pretty steadily over the years.”

As it is with most family-owned businesses, Yang grew up in the market, performing just about every job there.

“When I was in seventh grade, I was checking out customers,” he said. “I’ve done everything, but now mainly I work in the kitchen cooking with my father.”

Yang said business is “doing OK,” during the COVID-19 crisis, so far. The exception is the restaurant which, like all restaurants, relies exclusively on take-out orders.

“We’re not really doing much business on the restaurant side,” Yang said. “We still keep it going, though.”

Yang said the restaurant has already proven its strategic value, though.

“What we’ve seen since we opened the restaurant is that it’s brought in a lot more (non-Asian) customers,” Yang said. “They come in, taste the food and decide they want to make it at home. Since the market is in the same building, they’ll come over and shop.”

For Yang and the other workers, there is also another task they happily perform.

“Almost none of the writing on the packages is in English,” he said. “So we’ll read the packing and tell them about the product.”

He also provides cooking tips.

“I always ask them what they have,” he said. “Do they have pork? I’ll make some suggestions about some pork dishes. I think it’s fun for a lot of customers to sort of discover a new style of cooking. That’s good for us, so we’re happy to help.”

Yang said that while the market has held its own during the crisis, there’s a chance business will eventually decline.

“A lot depends on what happens in the fall when classes at Mississippi State begin again,” he said. “We’ll be watching to see if the international students come back. If they don’t, that’s going to affect us. We’ve built our business on them and while we are getting more (non-Asians) customers, the Asians students are who we rely on the most.”

Slim Smith is a columnist and feature writer for The Dispatch. His email address is [email protected]


Watch the video: Titanic 2 - The Return of Jack 2021 Movie Trailer Parody (February 2023).