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Artichoke-Prosciutto Gratin

Artichoke-Prosciutto Gratin


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Ingredients

  • 2 14-ounce cans artichoke hearts, drained, quartered
  • 6 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto
  • 1 1/2 cups crumbled Gorgonzola cheese
  • 1/2 cup pine nuts (about 2 ounces), toasted
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 teaspoon chopped fresh sage

Recipe Preparation

  • Pat quartered artichoke hearts dry with paper towels. Cut each prosciutto slice crosswise in half. Wrap each artichoke heart quarter in halved prosciutto slice. Place wrapped artichoke hearts in single layer in 13x9x2-inch glass baking dish. Pour cream over. Sprinkle with Gorgonzola, pine nuts, Parmesan, and sage. Bake until gratin is bubbling and sauce thickens, about 25 minutes. Serve warm.

Recipe by Downcity Food Cocktails of Providence RIReviews Section

Recipe Summary

  • ¾ cup all-purpose flour
  • ⅛ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon black pepper
  • ½ teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 4 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves, pounded 1/2 inch thick and cut into thirds
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 onion, minced
  • ½ cup white wine
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can chicken broth
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 (13.75 ounce) can artichoke hearts, drained and chopped, liquid reserved
  • ¼ cup capers, with liquid
  • 2 tablespoons butter

Mix together the flour, garlic powder, salt, pepper, and Italian seasoning on a plate. One by one, dredge the chicken pieces lightly in the prepared flour mixture.

Heat the olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the chicken pieces for 2 minutes per side, or until nicely browned. Remove from the skillet and set aside.

Using the same skillet, cook and stir the garlic and onion until translucent, about 5 minutes. Pour the white wine into the skillet, turn the heat to high, and cook until the wine reduces by half, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the chicken broth, lemon juice, artichoke hearts, reserved artichoke liquid, and browned chicken to the skillet. Reduce the heat to medium and cook until the sauce thickens, about 20 minutes. Stir in the capers and butter.


Roasted Asparagus Panini


All right, all right.  I was feeling too guilty for not actually posting any new recipes this morning, and since Panini Monday is four days away, Abram got to enjoy a Roasted Asparagus and Sweet Onion Panini with Gruyere for dinner tonight.  Here are the goods:

2 comments:

you really have to stop doing this to me.

you might say i should just take a little responsibility for my own self and stop reading cheese blogs if i do not intend to begin mainlining melted monterey jack, but i think that's too much to ask. could you please figure out how to make things that are as delicious as cheesy paninis out of kale? thanks!

This looks delicious! Let's do this one sometime. I need to get a panini machine though, so you don't have to lug your everywhere.


Artichoke-Prosciutto Gratin - Recipes

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WINTER WHITES / The season's luminous vegetables star in shimmering sophisticated recipes

White winter root vegetables often lie neglected in the produce bin, overshadowed by the more flamboyant winter greens and brightly colored citrus.

I guess it's not surprising that parsnips, celery root and Jerusalem artichokes often go unnoticed and unheralded. At first glance all three are knobby old Plain Janes, hiding all virtues behind an unprepossessing, even formidable, appearance. But take some time to look closely, purchase a couple to experiment, and you'll be rewarded with sweet- earthy, hard-to-pinpoint flavors that can make winter cooking surprisingly rewarding.

Here's a rundown of the three. The more accessible cauliflower gets an unusually lovely treatment elsewhere on this page, in Bouchon's Secret of Success cauliflower gratin.

PARSNIPS

Before potatoes usurped their position in the 1700s, the versatile parsnip was the primary starchy vegetable in Europe, where it is finally returning to favor.

The sturdy root has thick shoulders that taper quickly to a narrow tip. The outside is carrotlike and requires peeling, but the inside features an incredibly sweet, dense, pale white flesh that, once cooked, becomes soft and creamy.

To prepare it, first peel it with a vegetable peeler or sharp knife, then cut it into slices, cubes or sticks, as the recipe indicates. You can treat parsnips like potatoes roast, fry, mash or bake them.

CELERY ROOT

Sometimes labeled celeriac, celery root has a wonderfully pungent celery taste and aroma. It can be used either raw or cooked, and is the defining ingredient for one of my favorite dishes, the delicious French salad celery root remoulade. It's made with julienned celery root tossed in a dressing of mustard-flavored mayonnaise.

The round knobby root has an intimidating rough, hairy brown skin, which needs to be cut away, revealing the pristine white flesh. It's best to use a sharp paring knife, but even then it is difficult because of the knobs and whorls.

Once peeled, the root can be grated, minced or julienned and used raw. Or, it can be cubed or sliced and cooked like potatoes -- mashed, baked, fried or turned into gratins.

When choosing a celery root, weigh it in your hand. It should feel heavy for its size. If it doesn't, it is likely to have a hollow core and somewhat mealy flesh.

JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES

These are often sold under the marketing name "sunchoke" but they are not artichokes at all. Rather, the knobby, bumpy tubers are members of the sunflower family. The moniker Jerusalem was most likely derived from the Italian word for sunflower -- girasole.

The tubers range in size from a fist to a little finger and are covered with a thin reddish or brown skin. The skin can be removed with a vegetable peeler or a sharp knife (the better tool if they are very bumpy because a knife can reach into the crevices). Their flavor is at once nutty, mild and sweet with a hint of citrus.

Like celery root, Jerusalem artichokes can be used raw or cooked. When raw, they're crunchy, their texture resembling jicama and water chestnuts. Like potatoes, they are starchy and take well to mashing and sauteing.

VEAL SHANKS BRAISED WITH PARSNIPS

Veal shanks are one of my favorite cuts of meat. Their richness is enhanced by being cooked with parsnips and leeks, while the capers at the end add a tangy balance to the flavors. Remind diners to scoop out the yummy bone marrow in each slice.

INGREDIENTS:

-- 2 pounds veal shanks, cut into 4 pieces, each about 1 1/2 inches thick

-- 1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

-- 1/2 cup dry sherry or dry white wine

-- 1/2 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme or winter savory

-- 1 tablespoon capers, rinsed

INSTRUCTIONS: Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

Cut all the white and about one third of the pale- green part of the leeks into 1/2-inch slices.

Melt the butter in a heavy oven-proof casserole over medium heat. (The casserole should be just large enough to hold the shanks in a single layer.) Add the leeks and garlic and saute until soft and translucent, 3 or 4 minutes. Remove from heat set aside.

Heat the olive oil in a frying pan over medium- high heat. Put the flour on a sheet of wax paper or aluminum foil. Roll the veal shanks in the flour, then sprinkle them with half of the salt and pepper.

When the oil is hot, add the shanks, browning them crisply on all sides. Return the leeks to the heat, and place the shanks on top of them in a single layer.

Pour off all but about 1 tablespoon of the fat in the frying pan, then return it to the heat. Add the sherry, scraping up any bits that cling to the bottom of the pan. Add the beef broth, thyme, bay leaf, and the remaining salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, then pour over the leeks and shanks.

Place in the oven and cook for 1 1/4 hours, basting every 20 minutes or so. Add the parsnips, turning them in the liquid. Return to the oven and cook for about 45 minutes longer, until the meat pulls easily from the bone and the parsnips can be easily pierced with the tines of a fork. If too much liquid evaporates, add a little more beef broth. Remove from the oven and stir in the capers.

PER SERVING: 400 calories, 30 g protein, 34 g carbohydrate, 13 g fat (5 g saturated), 121 mg cholesterol, 727 mg sodium, 6 g fiber.

WARM JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE & PROSCIUTTO SALAD

The sweet, faintly nutty, somewhat citrusy flavor of Jerusalem artichokes is enhanced here with a dash of lemon juice and a garnish of walnuts. The artichokes are sauteed just enough to warm them though and slightly color them, leaving them still lightly crunchy. This is a beautiful salad with the pale-ivory tones of the roots accented by slivers of julienned spinach and rose-hued prosciutto.

INGREDIENTS:

-- 1 1/2 to 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

-- 2 tablespoons minced shallots or onions

-- 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

-- 1 to 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

-- 2/3 cup julienned spinach leaves

-- 2 ounces prosciutto, torn into thin strips

-- 1 1/2 tablespoons toasted walnut pieces

INSTRUCTIONS: Peel and thinly slice the Jerusalem artichokes. You should have about 2 cups.

Heat the oil in a frying pan over medium- high heat. Add the shallots and saute just until translucent. Add the Jerusalem artichokes and saute 2 to 3 minutes, until they just begin to brown slightly on the edges. Add the pepper and lemon juice to the pan and remove from the heat.

Arrange the Jerusalem artichokes on warm salad plates. Evenly distribute the spinach and prosciutto among the plates and garnish with the walnuts.

PER SERVING: 155 calories, 7 g protein, 15 g carbohydrate,

CELERY ROOT & MASHED POTATOES

This is a delicious variation of mashed potatoes. I love these with roast chicken and a side dish of steamed spinach.

INGREDIENTS:

-- 4 or 5 large boiling potatoes, peeled and cut into 5 or 6 pieces

-- 1 celery root, peeled and cut into 6 to 8 pieces

-- 3 or 4 tablespoons butter

-- 1/2 to 3/4 cup milk, half-and-half or cream

-- 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper

INSTRUCTIONS: Put 1 teaspoon of the salt in a pot with several quarts of water. Add the potatoes and celery root and bring to a boil over medium-high heat.

Cook for about 20 minutes, or until the potatoes and celery root are tender.

Drain well and return them to the hot cooking pot.

Add the butter and milk and mash well, using a potato masher or an electric beater, adding milk to the consistency you prefer.

Season with the remaining salt and pepper. Serves 6.

PER SERVING: 150 calories, 3 g protein, 20 g carbohydrate, 7 g fat (4 g saturated), 18 mg cholesterol, 483 mg sodium, 1 g fiber.

CELERY ROOT & BARLEY SOUP

This is a hearty soup, perfect for a cold winter's lunch or supper.

INGREDIENTS:

-- 1/2 teaspoon salt + salt to taste

-- 1 leek, including tender pale- green part, well-washed and minced

-- 1 celery root, peeled and finely diced

-- 4 cups beef or vegetable broth

-- 1 cup julienned, stemmed spinach

INSTRUCTIONS: Combine the barley, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 3 cups water in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover and cook until tender, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Remove from heat, drain, and set aside.

Melt the butter in a large saucepan or soup pot over medium heat.

Add the leek and the celery root and saute until the leek becomes translucent, 3 to 4 minutes.

Add the broth and the 2 cups water and bring to a boil over high heat.

Reduce the heat to low and simmer until the celery root is tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from heat and cool slightly.

Roughly puree half of the soup in a blender or food processor, and return to the saucepan.

Add the reserved cooked barley, the half-and-half, milk and spinach and place over medium heat.

Simmer until the soup is piping hot and the spinach is just wilted. Season with salt.

PER SERVING: 200 calories, 9 g protein, 24 g carbohydrate, 9 g fat (5 g saturated), 25 mg cholesterol, 382 mg sodium, 4 g fiber.

CELERY ROOT, MACHE & BLOOD ORANGE SALAD

This is an eye-catching salad because the celery root takes on the the vibrant color of the blood orange-juice dressing. The crisp, pungent celery root makes a delicious flavor combination with the nutty mache and the sweet oranges.

INGREDIENTS:

-- 3 tablespoons finely grated orange zest

-- 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar

-- 2 to 3 tablespoons walnut oil or extra virgin olive oil

-- Freshly ground pepper to taste

-- 4 cups mache or mixed baby greens

INSTRUCTIONS: Peel the celery root and, using a mandolin if you have one, cut the root into thin julienned strips.

Place in a bowl of ice water. Set aside.

Squeeze and strain the juice of 1 orange into a small bowl. Add half the orange zest, the vinegar, walnut oil and pepper.


Briciole

Novel Food #38: the finale (readings and recipes)


Between the day I announced the 38th edition of Novel Food and today, the world we live in has changed. One of the side effects of the sheltering in place, something a lot of us are doing now, is a renewed attention towards indoor activities, like reading and cooking. It is therefore a pleasure for me to contribute a set of suggestions for both.

A group of book-loving food bloggers has contributed posts, each describing a work of written words and the dish that the reading inspired. You are invited to join me on a literary/culinary tour. For each contribution, I offer a small bite to whet your appetite: follow the link to read the details of the written word and dish each participant describes. We hope you'll be inspired.

Debra of Eliot's Eats read Pomegranate soup by Marsha Mehran
and made Elephant Ears

"The amount of food in this book is staggering. There’s so many herbs and spices, Persian food, Italian food and Irish food, I just couldn’t keep up. I really wanted to try the red lentil soup (that lead so many people into the cafe) or the pomegranate soup of the title. I had, however, about over-souped The Hubs recently so I decided on a sweeter recipe: Elephant Ears. They were interesting. I did not roll mine thin enough so they were more doughy (read donut) than a thinly fried treat. We did enjoy the flavor (but, again, the rosewater became more pronounced a day later)."

Reading The Blue Zones Kitchen by Dan Buettner
inspired Debra to prepare a Minestrone

" I’ve been intrigued by the whole Blue Zones phenomenon for a while now. these are areas where the life expectancy and health is above that found in the rest of the world. Their longevity experiences do go beyond food though. In these areas—Sardinia Okinawa Loma Linda Ikaria, Greece and the Costa Rican Peninsula of Nicoya—it’s the entire lifestyle and sense of community. They walk where they need to go and grow what they need to eat—'their surroundings nudge them into the right behaviors' (19). It was definitely soup weather so I tried one of three hearty minestrone recipes from the Sardinian section."

Reading Saint Louis Days, Saint Louis Nights by the Junior League of Saint Louis
inspired Debra to prepare a Linguine artichoke prosciutto

"I started collecting [Junior League cookbooks] in my twenties after mom bought one from Iowa. I loved the menus and the entertaining slant to each of them. From then on, I would try to pick up a Junior League cookbook in whatever city we were in. I picked up Saint Louis Day, Saint Louis Nights when I had to be the accompanying administrator on a band trip. This recipe sounded like the perfect dish for a Saturday night dinner. a delicious pasta that comes together pretty quickly."

and Blue Eggs and Yellow Tomatoes by Jeanne Kelley
inspired a Carrot Salad with Olives

"I had the occasion to meet Kelley during my brief and anticlimactic appearance at a Cooking Light cook-off in 2009. I’ve made a few recipes, but the most recent one was a riff on a carrot salad. We had company here for lunch and I needed something quick and easy with ingredients I had on hand. (I certainly wasn’t running back to the grocery store with the hoarders!). There’s also a brief primer on starting a backyard flock (for blue eggs) and designing an edible garden (for yellow tomatoes)."

Claudia of Honey from Rock read Shroud for the Archbishop by Peter Tremayne
and was inspired to bake St. Patrick's Day Oat Scones

"I'm thrilled when I come across a new book series (new to me anyway) that is absolutely terrific, full of fascinating history, great characters, a mystery to be solved, well written and even with some humor and romance. [like the] Sister Fidelma Mysteries. She is. an Irish advocate and judge who is called upon to investigate a tricky and politically sensitive murder, while on an assignment in Rome. Oatcakes are mentioned in the series, as well as porridge, however, it was the oatcakes that caught my fancy (which I remember mainly from the first book as this second one takes place in Rome). I decided to make a version based on my standard scones recipe, using ground oats in place of half the flour, with the addition of raisins, cinnamon and nutmeg. "

Marg of The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader read Pomegranate soup by Marsha Mehran
which inspired her to make Persian Drizzle Cake

" I loved all the food content, the descriptions of the way that Marjan in particular nurtured those around her through her food. I liked that there were a number of recipes included in the book, and enjoyed the almost magical realism feel to it, focusing on the power of food to change the way that you are feeling. I guess I would call it magical realism lite for want of a better term. Overall, it's a readable book, without being amazing. I chose to top my cake with Turkish Delight Easter eggs rather than rose petals. "

"The novel involves time travel. Food is not really a central theme in this mind-bending and often beautifully written book. (Well, perhaps it’s not mind-bending for everyone. But anything that involves time travel tends to hurt my head.) There are repeated mentions of lemon tarts and grilled cheese sandwiches though. I do love both of those things. But I have a weak spot for grilled cheese sandwiches. I always have. The sandwiches were perfect. Every bite savoured. None wasted."


Cathy of Delaware Girl Eats read Pomegranate soup by Marsha Mehran
and prepared Red Lentil Soup

"Author Mehran writes about lentil soup: 'Red lentil soup, although quite seductive in scent, is as simple to make as its name suggests. In the recipe book filed away in her head, Marjan aways made sure to place particular emphasis on this soup's spices. Cumin added the aroma of afternoon lovemaking to the mixture for instance'. Now that's quite a statement. I cut this recipe in half from what was published in the book. This was totally enough to feed more than a few people."

Judy of Judy's Gross Eats was inspired by The Second-Worst Restaurant in France by Alexander McCall Smith
to bake Dorie Greenspan’s Around My French Table Cherry Clafoutis

"It’s the second in the Paul Stuart Series. After a bout of food poisoning, he finds himself drawn into the challenge of turning the restaurant into the Second-Best restaurant in France. One new dish that goes on the menu is Griotte Cherry Clafoutis. Griotte cherries are simply canned/jarred sour morello cherries, available at Trader Joe’s. It doesn’t take much time or effort to create this delicious dessert, and having the jar of cherries in the pantry means it can be put together and baked in no time at all."

Simona of briciole read Pomegranate soup by Marsha Mehran
and prepared Persian herb and greens frittata

" I was particularly intrigued by the description of 'a good apple khoresh, a stew made from tart apples, chicken and split peas' (page 60 of the hardback edition), but while I was searching for a recipe for that, I read about Kuku Sabzi, a kind of herb frittata traditionally prepared for Nowruz, the Iranian New Year that is celebrated on the spring equinox. The idea is that you can use greens and herbs you like and have available. A different combination means a different flavor, so this is a recipe that can be repeated without becoming boring. "

Simona also read Winter Cottage by Mary Ellen Taylor
and prepared a Chia pudding with blueberries

" Reading descriptions of the landscape was one of the book's attractions. I also liked how the three connected stories unfolded chapter by chapter. While I was reading the book, my husband and I had dinner at a restaurant that offered chia pudding as dessert. Tasting a spoonful reminded me that I like chia pudding. I decided to work some more on my own version. Also around the same time I enjoyed eating fresh blueberries, so I knew whatever I made would have blueberries."

My special "thank you!" to the event's contributors: I hope you enjoyed participating as I do hosting the event.

You will find a link to this roundup and to those of all the earlier editions on this page. If you are looking for additional reading suggestions, head over to the Cook the Books Club website. For the February-March edition, which I am hosting, we are reading Pomegranate Soup by Marsha Mehran. For the April-May edition we will read Hippie Food by Jonathan Kauffman.

The next edition of Novel Food will be in the summer: stay tuned for the announcement. In the meantime, take good care of yourself, your loved ones and your fellow citizens by observing health officials' instructions, read good books (maybe with the next Novel Food in mind), cook good dishes, and savor life's flow in its myriad expressions.


Yelp Houston

Hey, all. Valentine's day is coming up and, try as I do, I never seem to get it right. Anybody know of a few romantic places to go or things to do? Appreciate it.

Ouisie's Table is one of the best. They serve Chateau Briand and have folks walking around seranading the tables. And when the valet brings your car, there are Valentine's Day cookies for you. P-I-M-P

Coco's should be involved. Yesterday alone I saw so many couples getting crepes I wanted to gag!

If you want a romantic dinner in a restaurant, do it the day before Valentine's day. Valentine's day (like New Year's Eve and Mother's Day) are insane days at restaurants, and you won't get any establishment's best effort.

  • Anthony H.
  • Northern Quarter, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • 27 friends
  • 226 reviews

Ibiza always gets the romantic vote

I had a lovely romantic dinner with my wife last Valentine's Day at Jimmy Wilsons. The key to the evening was that we arrived very late (9:30) and avoided all the crowds and craziness alluded to above by Albert.

Apart from restaurants? The meal is nice, but where should you go after that? I'm thinking dancing. Of course tou can do both at Sambuca.

Thanks, guys. Appreciate it.

I just gave up a 8:30 PM reservation at Michaelangelo's for Valentine's dinner ($150/couple) to do something more original. Two friends and I are going to cook a gourmet dinner for our wives together. I've got the appetizer. I was thinking of making a salmon tartare with home-made mayonnaise. Any other ideas?

Dolph, that is the sweetest thing evar! Save me the leftovers.

Chris, Lucio's BYOB! It's my fave.

@Dolph: Artichoke hearts cut in half, wrapped with prosciutto, put in a pan, pour heavy whipping cream over so that they are almost covered, sprinkle gorganzola cheese and pine nuts on top, bake at 350 for 30-35 mins. Fantastic.

@ Clinton: Wow! Love artichoke hearts and pine nuts. This sounds delicious.

I think this would be fabulous to have at any time of the year.

@ Dolph: If you make this, let us know how it turns out (both dish-wise and the guest reaction).

Then you would love that dish Edgar and it is great for anytime.

I'm thinking UYE this Valentine's at Dolph's.

@Clinton and Edgar: I think I'm going to go with both the tartare and Clinton's suggestion. I definitely will provide feedback after the event. Uh. UYE at my place? Sorry, dudes. The intent is to get my lovely wife amorous. "The more the merrier" doesn't work too well in this regard. LOL

@Dolph: We understand. If you do my suggestion, make sure that you cut the slices of prosciutto in half long ways. I'm excited to hear what you and your lovely think about them. Enjoy.

  • Anthony H.
  • Northern Quarter, Manchester, United Kingdom
  • 27 friends
  • 226 reviews

Alex - Za Za Hotel Spa is doing a couples deal which includes all the treatments and brunch. If you are quick you can grab my booking cos I just cancelled.

Just out of curiosity what was the deal at the Za Za Hotel Spa? Sounded like it would be $$ so I didn't call.

I'm going to be in the corner of my bedroom on the floor in the fetal position listening to one of my cry tapes.

Chis Enjoy, we were just there the first part of January for our anniversary. It was very good
We tried A Study in Tuna
Raw Ahi Tuna done 3 ways
Carpaccio
Tartar
and rolled in cracked black pepper
I still dream about the Tuna, as well as the steamed mussels in Shiner Bock and toasted Ancho from Reef.

Chris . isn't your finace` on yelp aswell? .. so .. won't she be reading this and perhaps it would
ruin the surprise?

Unless its not a surprise

Know any places that stay open later? I don't get off work until 9 PM. I figure I'll go out tomorrow instead.

David - i just made a reservation at nelore's for 10pm. I haven't been there, but hear very good things about it if you're still looking for a place that's open later.

@Amy I looked at their website and it says it closes at 10 are they staying open later just for valentines?

David--yep! At least I hope so, I made reservations for 10pm on Valentine's Day. that was the only time they said they had available. So it sounds like they'll be extending their hours :) Hope this helps!

Grr. I hate Valentines Day, it is so overrated. Just get the stupid holiday over already!

I'm just looking forward to hanging out with my boyfriend. doing things that we usually do. We're going to steer clear of all the cheesy overcompensating events/hangouts and go to our favorite chill bars and have a barroom game competition. We'll cook a nice diner of course. I'm thinking scallops seared in truffle oil with bacon. but no clue for the sides yet. Hmmmm. maybe a risotto of some sort?

Good luck everyone. went to Ruggles on my last VDay a few years back and it was sooo crazy busy, I refused to do that whole thing again.

@Clinton - I found the "official" recipe for Artichoke-Prosciutto Gratin online. You're instructions were right on. I'm going out shopping now to get all the ingredients.


What toppings can you put on a baked potato?

This baked potato recipe is very versatile, and you can substitute any of your favorite toppings that you already have in your pantry, or toppings that you find at your local supermarket. The Spanish inspired toppings are the best part of this potato recipe, and I always recommend using the best quality products available because this makes a big difference in taste and flavor. Get inspired with food from other countries. Here are some topping ideas:

  • Mexican style baked potato: use toppings like Mexican Crema, roasted or fresh corn, Monterey Jack cheese, salsa verde, and chorizo. Also, create other combinations with chopped cilantro, chopped tomatoes, jalapeños, chopped red onions, avocado or guacamole.
  • Greek style baked potato: use toppings like oregano, feta cheese, Greek yogurt, roasted red pepper spread or chopped roasted red pepper, Kalamata tapenade or chopped Kalamata olives.
  • Middle Eastern style baked potato: use toppings like labneh cheese, za&rsquoatar, sumac, roasted eggplant, Aleppo pepper, chopped Kebab/kabobs or chopped kibbeh.
  • Italian style baked potato: use toppings like mascarpone cheese, chopped artichoke, prosciutto, truffle or any of these chesses: Parmigiano-Reggiano, fontina, or pecorino.
  • French style baked potato: use toppings like crème fraiche, niçoise olives, ratatouille, gruyere cheese, caramelized onions or mushrooms.

I&rsquom pretty sure you guys will enjoy this Spanish style baked potato as much as I do. With a perfectly crispy skin, and a creamy and fluffy interior, this recipe will become a hit with your family or with your friends at that special dinner party.


Tuesday, November 25, 2008

PiePiePiePie Part 4: Bourbon pecan pie

11:51: it's in the oven would that the julep were so simple!

11:45: Toasting pecans also observing the chilling of the mint julep pie. we are not yet convinced.

11:38: zesting, zesting, zesting.

We are, unsurprisingly, behind schedule, but we're struggling to catch up. At the very least, we plan to get the Bourbon Pecan Pie ready for action.

Oh, yeah, here's the recipe! We got it from here, the great nexus of recipes. All hail!

1 Butter Pie Crust Dough disk
1 cup (packed) golden brown sugar
1 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted
3 large eggs
4 tablespoons bourbon, or to taste as appropriate
2 tablespoon grated orange peel
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 cups pecan halves (about 9 1/2 ounces), toasted

Roll out dough on lightly floured surface to 13-inch round. Transfer to 9-inch deep-dish glass pie dish. Trim overhang to 1/2 inch. Fold overhang under crimp edges decoratively. Refrigerate 1 hour.
Preheat oven to 375°F. (I know you're supposed to do this part, but I rarely bother and it always comes out just fine: Line pie crust with foil. Fill with dried beans or pie weights. Bake until crust edges begin to brown and crust is set, about 17 minutes. Remove foil and beans.) Bake until golden brown, pressing with back of fork if crust bubbles. Transfer pie crust to rack. Maintain oven temperature.
Whisk brown sugar, corn syrup, and melted butter in large bowl to blend. Whisk in eggs 1 at a time. Stir in bourbon, grated orange peel, vanilla, salt, and then toasted pecans. Pour filling into prepared crust. Bake pie until edges puff and center is just set, about 50 minutes. Cool pie on rack at least 1 hour.

PiePiePiePie Part 3: Mint Julep Pie

12:19 am: Biscuit here: Three out of three people think that the mint julep pie is effing delicious. . Now we just need to figure out how to make it pretty. Ideas are already percolating. More details tomorrow when Mint Julep Pie Mark II comes out, and we post the recipe. Yessssss!

11:57: So far, so not quite what we were after--at least aesthetically. Stay tuned, we try again in the morning. Tips and tricks on how to bend a custard pie to your will totally appreciated.

11:19: I should not be trusted with custard. We think we can salvage the mint julep pie, but it may yet turn ugly. stay tuned.

10:58: Biscuit here. I redid the ganache with less cream, and the custard is on the makeshift double-boiler, but we may have had some crossed signals with regards to the "half-batch" we were going for, and it might or might not be thickening. This is totally the most fun dessert of the night!

10:46 the milk is scalding i get schooled on how to blend egg yolks and sugar biscuit creates a non-ganache that is really closer in personality to the best hot chocolate you've ever had.

9:25 : I'll be honest--this dessert is the wild card. We found ourselves with a large bottle of bourbon and a ridiculous pile of mint, and figured that the best way to dispose of both surpluses was to make a dessert from them specifically, a pie modeled after that favorite of mine, the mint julep. The problem was that we had no recipe to riff off of, which meant that not only were we responsible for the art of the project, but the chemistry as well. So. we're experimenting here. Tonight's live blog will cover our testing phase if we find something that works, we'll make a proper batch tomorrow.

PiePiePiePie Part 2: Baileys White Chocolate Cheesecake

If I recall correctly, according to Alton Brown, the humble cheesecake is in fact not a cake, but a pie, so I feel fully justified in including this in the Pie category.

We've been making this one for a few years, and what isn't eaten immediately will transmogrify over the next day into the single most coveted leftover EVER. I won't bother denying that I have been caught sitting in my pajamas watching TV, with the entire remains of this cheesecake in my lap. The white choco and the Baileys are spectacular.

Bailey's White Chocolate Cheesecake

1 graham cracker crust (see previous), in a 10 inch springform pan
1 1/2 lb cream cheese
3/4 c sugar
3 eggs
1/3 (or 2/3!) c Baileys -- I tend to splash in extra
1 tsp vanilla
3 oz (although I always use more) good white choco -- Callebaut is my fave here

Beat the cream cheese and sugar together in a large bowl. Electric mixers work well, but I prefer to use a large wooden spoon and elbow grease the moment when it comes together and goes creamy is like magic. In a separate bowl, whisk up the eggs, Baileys and vanilla, even if you think it's weird to pour Baileys into eggs. Pour the egg mixture into the cream cheese and stir up until well mixed and creamy again. Pop in the white choco, stir up, and pour into the graham cracker crust.
Bake at 325 F for about 50 minutes to an hour, until the edges are puffed up and the middle is dry. Garnish, if you really feel you need any, with crushed pecans.

PiePiePiePie, Part 1: 40-proof pumpkin pie.

This one tends to go pretty smoothly (knock on wood). A few field notes:

1. I don't measure my spices in this thing. I used to smoke, so I run on the assumption that everyone who will be eating this pie suffers from a similarly depressed state of taste--thus, spices are hiiiiiiigh.

2. The liquor used is entirely at your discretion--I have, in times past, used bourbon, frangelico, butterscotch schnapps, and rum. The latter is really my favorite, as it adds a certain piratical bent to my humble pastry--and anything that makes me say "Arrrr!" is a good thing.

1/2 batch butter pie crust (enough for an open-top pie)

  1. In a large bowl, lightly beat the eggs.
  2. Add the pumpkin
  3. Add the cream and liquor
  4. Add the sugar
  5. Add the spices (to taste) and salt
  6. Mix everything thoroughly, then pour into your prepared pie crust.
  7. Bake at 425 degrees for 15 minutes then, reduce heat to 350 degrees, and cook for a further 40-50 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool on rack for min of two hours. Refrigerate till serving.

Step 1: Pie crusts.

"There's something about the smell of butter." --Shiv

7:04 : We begin the important underpinnings of our sweet and delightful treats: the crusts. Biscuit's on your pate brisee, I'm pulverizing graham crackers. I get to play with Biscuit's 10-cup food processor I fully expect to be unseated by its RAW POWER.

  1. Pulverize the first three ingredients in your food processor until you have fine crumbs
  2. Mix the butter in until it becomes slightly sticky.
  3. Press into desired pans, lightly buttered

For a double-crust pie, double the ingredients, divide the dough in half, and form two disks.

1 1/4 cups all purpose flour
1/2 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup (1 stick) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes use a higher fat content European-style butter like Plugra for wildly-enhanced flakiness
3 tablespoons (or more) ice water

Blend flour, sugar, and salt in processor. Add butter and cut in, using on/off turns, until coarse meal forms. Add 3 tablespoons water. Using on/off turns, blend just until moist clumps form, adding more water by 1/2 tablespoonfuls if dough is dry. Gather dough into ball flatten into disk. Wrap in plastic refrigerate 1 hour. (Can be made 2 days ahead. Keep chilled. Soften slightly at room temperature before rolling.)

Apologies for our terseness, but we've got some shit to do. I'm sure you understand. )

Game On!

The Herb Butter Is In The Fridge


Have you ever made food that was more ritual than recipe? The kind of food where you know you could take shortcuts, and get the exact same results, but you don't actually want to? The herb-infused butter for my Herb-Roasted Turkey (you'll see this one in full on Thursday!) fits the bill exactly. After the groceries come in, it's the first thing I make. A simple combination of finely-chopped thyme, parsley, and sage, the flavors and rich, green aromas intensify beautifully if made ahead and left in the fridge for a few days.

But as I said: ritual over recipe. The following provides a little insight into both the fine art of making a quality herb butter, and my occasional food-related delusions.

1) Get everything out of the fridge that you're going to need. Two sticks of butter, and a large bunch each of fresh thyme, flat-leaf parsley, sage. By the time you're done dismantling the herbs, the butter will have softened perfectly.

2) Dig around in your cupboards until you find the perfect metal bowl. The little bowl you see pictured above was lucky enough to have been chosen the first year I made this, and as such, I refuse to use anything else. It's a little too shallow for anything else, even scrambling a few eggs, so this butter is really the only reason I have kept the bowl with me through four moves.

3) Start with the thyme. After you rinse the thyme, pat it as dry as you can. I've even left it sitting out for a little while to dry properly -- it makes the later chopping much easier, and I try to avoid adding additional moisture to the finished product. But that's easy picking these tiny leaves off of their stems is what takes the most time. I'm serious. I was picking leaves through The Rachel Maddow Show, The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, and an episode of Futurama. This is because I insist on picking the leaves off the stems individually, instead of just ripping them off all in one go, like a normal person might do, by pinching the top of the stem and pulling your fingers down along it. While I fully realize that getting bits of tiny, tender stem from the longer leaves totally wouldn't matter, I have decided that the extra, invisible ingredient into this butter is a couple of hours of unblinking attention and love. I have made matters worse for myself by also deciding that the tiniest leaves are the ones that taste the best, so I tend to take extra effort to get as many of them as I can. You should end up with a pile of leaves that looks like this (left: whole thyme, right: deconstructed thyme):

4) Now chop. It does help if you patted your thyme dry -- it stops the tiny leaves from sticking like mulch all over your knife.

5) Keep chopping. We want this extra-fine. It should look like coffee grounds. green ones.

6) Now for the parsley. Rinse, pat dry, as above. Again, I spend too much time picking the individual leaves of of the stems, but this only takes about five minutes, as the parsley leaves are approximately ten thousand times larger than a thyme leaf. Chop as above -- extra fine.

7) The sage is up. Repeat as before. While I generally try for the same volume of each herb, post-chop, I usually can't resist adding extra sage anyway.

8) Pop all of these into your perfect metal bowl. (See? Isn't it perfect? It's so shiny!)

9) Add about 1 tsp each of salt and fresh-ground black pepper, and drop in the two sticks of now marvelously softened butter. Mash everything together -- it's easiest if you use the back of a spoon against the side of the bowl. You'll be left with a glorious mound of perfect, verdant, marvelously-scented herb butter. Cover and store in the fridge until Thanksgiving, being sure to take it out and smell it a few times a day until then.

Of course, in this case I'm going to be using this butter with my turkey (and as a finisher for the gravy), but it works wonderfully in more day-to-day applications as well -- I bet a grilled cheese sandwich, buttered on the outside with this, would be spectacular.

For those of you unwilling to adhere strictly to the Doctrine of the Buttery Faith, the simple version is below. You could probably even do the chopping bit in a food processor, and have the whole thing knocked out in five minutes.

Herb-Infused Butter
Adapted (as are many of my favorites) from Bon Appétit, November 2000, by way of epicurious.com.

2 sticks of softened butter
3 tbsp finely-chopped fresh thyme
3 tbsp finely-chopped fresh parsley
3 tbsp finely-chopped fresh sage
1 tsp each salt and freshly-ground black pepper


(6 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)

  • Author: Sonja Overhiser
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Yield: 6
  • Diet: Vegetarian

Description

This vegetarian French onion soup is the ultimate comfort food! It’s got the rich flavor of the classic, topped with a golden crust of cheese.

Ingredients

For the caramelized onions

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 3 pounds yellow onions ( 5 medium)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup dry sherry (or white wine)
  • 1 tablespoon flour

For the soup

  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 8 ounces mushrooms
  • 1 carrot
  • 2 celery ribs
  • 6 garlic cloves
  • 8 cups water
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon eachgarlic powder and onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon vegan Worcestershire sauce (purchased or use this substitute)
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 6 slices Swiss or Gruyere cheese (or shredded)
  • 6 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • 6 large or 12 small slices bread, sliced about 1/2 ” thick

Instructions

  1. Caramelize the onions: Thinly slice the onions about 1/8-inch thick. In a soup pot, heat the butter over medium high heat. Add the onions and sauté for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring often, until very soft and just starting to brown on the bottom. Reduce to medium-low heat and stir in the kosher salt. Cook for 40 to 45 minutes, stirring every 5 to 10 minutes and adjusting the heat so they continue to cook slowly without burning. The mushrooms will change from raw to golden to light brown to very dark brown, and reduce in volume by about 1/4. (Make ahead tip: Make the caramelized onions in advance and refrigerate until ready to make the soup. Reheat in a pan and go to step 3.)
  2. Meanwhile, make the homemade broth: Slice the mushrooms. Wash and cut the carrot in half length-wise, then into large chunks. Cut the celery into large pieces. Smash and peel the garlic. In a second pot, heat the butter over medium heat. Add the mushrooms and sauté until browned, about 6 to 7 minutes. Add 8 cups water, kosher salt, and vegetables. Bring to a boil and simmer for 30 minutes. (Make ahead: Make the broth in advance and refrigerate until serving. Then warm before proceeding to Step 3.)
  3. Simmer the soup: When onions are very reduced and dark brown, stir in the sherry and deglaze the pan by scrape all the bits off the bottom of the pan. Sprinkle with the flour and stir until the onions are coated. Strain the homemade broth into the onions (discarding the vegetables). Add 1 cup water and bring to a simmer for 2 minutes.
  4. Broil the topping: Place the soup into 6 oven-safe small bowls or ramekins. Preheat a broiler to high or an oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Top with bread slices (about 1/2-inch thick), 1 slice Swiss or Gruyere cheese, and 1 tablespoon grated Parmesan per bowl. Broil 1 to 3 minutes (or bake for 20 minutes) until the cheese is melted and browned. Place on a plate and serve immediately, taking care since the bowls are very hot.
  • Category: Main Dish
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: French

Keywords: Vegetarian French onion soup, French onion soup, How to make French onion soup


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