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Art Smith’s 12 Tips for Eating Healthy on the Road

Art Smith’s 12 Tips for Eating Healthy on the Road


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Celebrity chef Art Smith dishes on dining on the road

Art Smith shares his tips for eating healthy on the road.

Chef Art Smith, who has cooked for Oprah Winfrey and other celebrities and is the executive chef and co-owner of five restaurants, shares his 12 trips for eating healthy on the road.

See Art Smith’s 12 Tips for Eating Healthy on the Road

Smith is a fan of raw and fresh foods, but also likes to indulge on occasion with comfort foods, both at home and on the road. Smith’s healthy trip tips include packing almonds and fresh fruits like SweeTango apples, a new variety of apple that is a cross between the Honeycrisp and Zestar! varieties.

Smith is the judge of the SweeTango Writing Contest, which invites apple lovers to describe the sensation of biting into a SweeTango apple in 50 words or less for a chance to win $5,000, a box of SweeTango apples, and have their description featured in stores. The SweeTango Writing Contest ends Oct. 12, 2012. Entrants must be residents of the U.S. or Canada, excluding the province of Quebec.

"On the road, in the air, or at the table, eat food that’s fresh," advises Smith, who is the executive chef and co-owner of Table Fifty-Two in Chicago, Art and Soul in Washington, D.C., Southern Art and Bourbon Bar in Atlanta, Joanne Trattoria in New York City, and LYFE Kitchen in Palo Alto, Calif.

In addition to Smith’s tip to pack apples, see 11 more healthy trip tips from Smith for eating healthy while on the road,

Lauren Mack is the Travel Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @lmack.


Staying Fit and Healthy on the Road

For Jaume Tàpies, travel is a way of life. His position as chairman of Relais & Chateaux, an association of fine hotels and gourmet restaurants, requires him to be on the road for 250-300 days out of the year to visit the company's 480 properties in 58 countries across the world.

Being an expert globetrotter can take a toll on the body, but the 41-year-old Mr. Tàpies is also a connoisseur of healthy living: He is a former cross-country ski champion. Mr. Tàpies recently spoke with The Wall Journal Street Journal about keeping a healthy diet while traveling, avoiding airport food and the real meaning of luxury today.

WSJ: Often when people are on the go, they don't keep up as well with eating healthy. Do you have any tips for maintaining a good diet while traveling?

Mr. Tàpies: Almost everyday I have lunch and dinner in a restaurant. So obviously I cannot eat everything -- and I love to eat -- so it's just about being conscious.

My rule -- and this is something that is so easy to respect -- there are three things: bread, wine and food. Choose two of these things. So if I have wine, I don't have bread. If I have bread, I don't have wine. And dessert. Dessert could be a fourth.


What to eat when you’re on the road with your motorcycle

Are you planning your next two-wheel adventure across the country? Before you get on the saddle and ride into the sunset with your rain gear on, make sure you have everything packed, and that includes some healthy and nutritious snacks that will keep your stomach full and save you money in the long run.

Meat and fish cans

Meat cans will become your best friends if you plan a motorcycle trip on a budget. You can replace at least one of your daily meals with a good source of proteins on the go and save money and time until reaching your destination.

Depending on the length of your trip, we suggest packing at least a dozen cans with your favorite meat products and fish. Fish is not only a good source of proteins but it also contains omega-3 fatty acids that will keep your eyes and bones strong and your mind focused on the road. The best fish to bring along are salmon, tuna, and sardines.

Meat cans come in endless varieties and tastes but we suggest sticking to steaks or files, without marinades or sauces that might alter after a couple of days. Pork sausages are always a good choice, along with turkey and chicken breast.

For a healthy meal on the go, we suggest packing some crackers in an empty Pringles box or any other metallic box to prevent them from crumbling and combine them with your choice of meat. This tasty meal won’t take more than a minute to prepare and will keep you full for several hours.

Real veggies

Rich in natural fibers, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals, veggies are the perfect snack on the go. Celery and carrots are the most common vegetable snacks for those with a busy lifestyle but you can take anything on the road, as long as it won’t alter after a couple of miles. Bell peppers and cucumber slices are also delicious and easy to store.

Biltong

Biltong refers to a type of dried, cured meat. It originated in Zimbabwe, South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zambia, and other Southern African countries. Biltong cuts vary, and they’re available in flat pieces that are sliced across the grain and meat strip fillets. So, should you consider eating biltong during a motorcycle tour?

Biltong is lightweight and easy to pack. You’ll get more protein than beef jerky, dried peas, peanut butter, tuna, and hummus. That’s why it’s a great snack if you’re on a motorcycle tour. In addition, motorcycle tours can be tedious, which would require an extra source of energy to strengthen your endurance. Biltong can provide you the extra power you need to achieve your motorcycle tour goals.

Here are the good-to-know facts about biltong:

  • Biltong is made from beef silverside prime cuts, air-dried, and then marinated to an authentic traditional South African recipe.
  • The marinate consists of pepper, rock salt, vinegar, and coarsely ground coriander. The meat is air-dried in a drying room. It’s handpicked before sliced and ready to enjoy.
  • Eating some fruits and biltong every several hours while motorcycle touring can help a rider obtain wholesome sugars from fruits and protein. By doing so, energy is replenished, and your muscles avoid easy fatigue.
  • Some forms of beef jerky have up to 22 grams of sugar per 2 ounces serving. Also, they have added preservatives, soy, and gluten. Biltong is a good option for people with dietary restrictions or allergies.
  • Biltong enables you to add more variety to your diet. Motorcycle tours and eating the same lightweight snacks could become boring over time and not good for your diet, so adding biltong will definitely change your perspective about lightweight snacks. Biltong is delicious and a good addition to boring motorcycle meals.

Hummus

When going on a motorcycle journey it’s good to pack foods and dishes that will survive the heavy road, and the high temperatures while still providing all the elements your body needs to get through the day.

Hummus is a superfood that is packed in proteins and will help you stay satiated for hours in a row. It is easy to prepare and it comes in all combinations of tastes and blends to meet your unique dietary requirements.

You can use it for a dip or spread it on crunchy raw vegetables for a healthy and delicious snack whenever you’re in a hurry. It doesn’t need refrigeration either and will be good for a couple of days as long as it is stored in a cool and dry place.

Fruits and nuts

Alone or in delicious mixes, fruits and nuts provide almost all necessary nutrients for your body to stay healthy and your brain to focus on the road. Fruits are packed with vitamins while nuts represent an important source of proteins.

Nuts can be eaten raw, roasted or salted and almost all of them can become great companions for your motorbike road trip. However, not all fruits will stay fresh inside your backpack, so you need to choose those that won’t get mushy or bruised after just a couple of hours.

Pears, apricots, oranges, and apples can last minor beatings and high temperatures in your luggage but we can’t say the same for berries, bananas, peaches or grapes. However, you may still have a chance with dried fruits like banana chips, figs, and coconut chunks. Just make sure to eat them in moderation as most of them are rich in carbs and sugars.


Eating Well and Staying Active While Traveling

Deputy Executive Editor Sarah Schlichter's idea of a perfect trip includes spotting exotic animals, hiking through pristine landscapes, exploring new neighborhoods on foot, and soaking up as much art as she can. She often attempts to recreate recipes from her international travels after she gets home (which has twice resulted in accidental kitchen fires—no humans or animals were harmed).

Sarah joined the SmarterTravel team in 2017 after more than a decade at the helm of IndependentTraveler.com. Sarah's practical travel advice has been featured in dozens of news outlets including the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, USA Today, Budget Travel, and Peter Greenberg Worldwide Radio. Follow her on Twitter @TravelEditor.

The Handy Item I Always Pack: "A journal. Even years later, reading my notes from a trip can bring back incredibly vivid memories."

Ultimate Bucket List Experience: "Road tripping and hiking through the rugged mountains of Patagonia."

Travel Motto: "'To awaken quite alone in a strange town is one of the pleasantest sensations in the world.'—Freya Stark"

Aisle, Window, or Middle Seat: "Aisle. I get restless on long flights and like to be able to move around without disturbing anyone else."

Without access to your local supermarket or your favorite Pilates class, on your next trip you may find yourself subsisting on fattening restaurant meals and abandoning your usual exercise routine to sit for long hours on planes or buses. Vegetarian, organic, low carb, low cal, low fat &mdash no matter which diet you&rsquore on, there&rsquos a good chance it went down the tubes on your last vacation.

But believe it or not, it is possible to eat well on a cross-country road trip, to stay active without access to a gym and even to go on a cruise without gaining 5 or 10 pounds. You can eat healthy and stay active no matter what kind of trip you&rsquore taking.


What's Your Diet Doing This Weekend?

To lose weight and keep it off, you've gotta stick with it&mdashMonday through Sunday. These tips make it a cinch.

There's something about weekends that sends caution&mdashand calories&mdashto the wind. Even if your workweek is all about smart snacks and sensible dinners, for many of us, all weight loss bets are off come 5 PM Friday, says clinical psychologist Robert Maurer, PhD, author of One Small Step Can Change Your Life. "It's almost like a dam bursting," he says. We're tired and feel like we've earned the right to put healthy weight loss habits on hold. A University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill study revealed that adults take in an extra 222 calories&mdashnearly 15% of the number of calories an average woman needs each day&mdashover the course of the weekend (including Friday).

Of course you want to live a little on the weekend, but if you're trying for weight loss, or even just keep the scale steady, you have to maintain a certain level of vigilance. Here, how to rethink your weekend habits so you'll lose weight all week.

WEEKEND THINK This week was tough I deserve to splurge
HEALTHIER SPURGE Splurge with extra savvy. The need for a reward is human nature, says Stephen Gullo, PhD, author of The Thin Commandments Diet. And for many, that "something special" is food. You can't change what makes you happy, but you can minimize the diet damage. Choose one portion-controlled item that requires you to leave the house, such as a cup of lobster bisque from your favorite eatery or a small, fresh pastry from the bakery. "It's more rewarding to have a nice treat than to waste calories on regular things you can have anytime, like potato chips or cookies," says Gullo. Doing something special works, too: Catch a movie, get a massage at the spa, or buy a flattering pair of yoga pants. (Check out 10 more little ways to indulge yourself with absolutely no guilt.)

WEEKEND THINK Eating and entertaining go hand in hand
HEALTHIER SPURGE Plan some activities, not meals. When you eat with friends, you consume 50% more than you do alone, found a Pennsylvania State University study. Researchers suspect that it's not the food but a tendency to lengthen the meal to keep the good times going. Instead, shift your notion of fun to nonfood activities. You likely have a few favorites that don't involve eating&mdashbuild on these until you shift the balance from drinks and dinner to window-shopping or visiting a new art exhibit. If you do want to grab a bite, stick to lunch&mdashit's easier to eat light, and you probably won't order cocktails.

WEEKEND THINK I run around all week now I just want to kick back
HEALTHIER SPURGE Try a little active relaxation. Some decompressing is essential, but planting yourself on the couch for hours can lead to trouble. A long stretch of inactivity can inspire compulsive nibbling, especially if boredom is one of your overeating triggers, says Gullo. And the immobility quickly adds up: Skip your regular 1-mile walk, add those extra 222 calories you tend to eat on weekends&mdashand that alone can equal a gain of about 7 pounds a year! Sure, you can indulge in afternoon channel surfing, but not all day long. Impose a time limit 2 hours is fine. And use that extra time to do something good for yourself, like chopping veggies for dinner that night and snacks to take to work the next week. Also, don't forget to work downtime into your week so you don't feel as exhausted come the weekend.

WEEKEND THINK A predinner cocktail is par for the course
HEALTHIER SPURGE Drink it during the meal. With fewer responsibilities and no early morning wake-up calls, even weekday teetotalers don't think twice about a cocktail before dinner&mdashand then another while they eat. The problem: "Alcohol breaks down inhibitions, so it's harder to make healthy food choices when you do sit down," says Gary Foster, PhD, director of the Center for Obesity Research and Education at Temple University. A glass of Cabernet and a few handfuls of mixed nuts while making dinner or waiting to be seated can add up to more than 600 calories&mdashand that's even before the appetizer. Instead, have the wine with your meal, and save added calories by swapping fries for veggies or sharing the lower-cal sorbet, not the chocolate cake. Choose high-quality drinks you'll want to savor, such as vintage wine or single malt scotch, over high-cal fruity concoctions, and sub in one or two club sodas with lime. (These 15 smarter cocktails and mocktails are a good place to start.)

WEEKEND THINK I'll just have one last hurrah before I start my diet on Monday
HEALTHIER SPURGE Drop the "last supper" mindset. Healthy eating and weight loss doesn't have an on/off switch it's a way of life, says Dave Grotto, RD, a spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. He encourages his clients to treat themselves during the week, maybe with a light beer one night or a child's size ice cream cone another, so they're not feeling deprived and desperate enough to polish off a half-pint of ice cream on Friday night for 500 calories.) If you blow it, don't wait until Monday to get back on track start your weight loss plan at your next meal or snack. Besides, giving yourself free rein on the weekend can reactivate negative eating patterns that are bound to carry over into the following week, says Gullo. Keep it up, and extra pounds are almost guaranteed.

WEEKEND THINK Obligations throw off my usual routine
HEALTHIER SPURGE Take control&mdashwherever and whenever you can. Between errands, quality time with the kids, grocery shopping, and household chores, your weekends are often too packed to accommodate your regular diet-and-exercise schedule. But part of developing healthy weight loss habits for life is about adapting, says Foster. It just takes a few adjustments: Toss a low-cal energy bar or apple into your purse before hitting the mall so you're not tempted by the food court if you know you're going to be on the road all afternoon, have a later breakfast or if restaurant reservations aren't until late, snack on string cheese and whole grain crackers to hold you over, and then order lean fish or meat and vegetables for dinner.

It's okay to shuffle around meals and snacks, just don't skip them or your hunger will overpower you, says Katherine Tallmadge, RD, author of Diet Simple. And plan active family outings that aren't doable during the week, such as a tennis match with your spouse or a hike with the kids. You burn slightly more calories than you would at your 9-to-5 desk job, which helps even out a sensible weekend splurge.


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We know you love your weeknight sitcoms, but it's important you enjoy your meals sitting at your kitchen table—not in front of the television. Why? Carolyn Brown, MS RD of Foodtrainers explains that not only do the commercials for unhealthy food and drink increase our craving for junk, but because TV is so distracting, it also makes it harder to notice how full we're becoming until we've scarfed down too much. Science agrees with Brown: A recent study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that paying attention while eating can aid weight loss efforts, while distracted eating can lead to a long-term increase in food consumption.


Clean-Eating Meal Plan for Beginners

If you&aposre new to clean eating, the premise is simple𠅊nd following a meal plan (or simply using it for inspiration) can make it even easier to understand what it&aposs all about. Clean-eating is a great way to up your intake of good-for-you foods (like whole grains, lean protein, healthy fats and plenty of fruits and veggies), while limiting the stuff that can make you feel not-so-great in large amounts (think refined carbs, alcohol, added sugars and hydrogenated fats).

Here at EatingWell, we approach clean-eating sensibly. While all foods can be part of a healthy diet, sometimes you just need to hit reset and focus on eating more of the healthy foods you may be skimping on. With 14 days of wholesome meals and snacks, this easy-to-follow clean-eating meal plan is a great way get more of those good for you foods.

If 14 days feel like too much, start with our 3-Day Clean Eating Kick-Start Meal Plan and go from there. Once you conquer this 14-day plan, try our Clean-Eating Challenge for 30 days, where you can plan to eat tons of delicious clean-eating foods, like what you&aposll find in this meal plan.

Looking for more? See all of our clean-eating meal plans and healthy clean-eating recipes.


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Kefir has gained a reputation as a good way to keep your gut in check, thanks to its fermentation process, but this milk-like liquid boasts an astounding 10 grams of protein per cup. Like cottage cheese, kefir can be something you have to get used to before it becomes your go-to protein booster. Luckily, many companies now sell kefir-based drinks infused with healthy ingredients to up the taste profile without sacrificing health. If you'd prefer another healthy, drinkable snack, try these Best Bottled Smoothies You Can Buy, According to Nutritionists.


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