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Seafood & Andouille Gumbo

Seafood & Andouille Gumbo


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This gumbo is "chock-full of vegetables, seafood, and sausage." It includes both Old Bay seasoning and garam masala. The recipe recommends that you make it a day in advance for the best of flavors.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 Cup canola oil or rendered duck fat
  • 1/2 Cup unbleached all-purpose flour
  • 2 yellow onions, cut into 1/2 inch dice
  • 2 green bell peppers, cut into 1/2 inch dice
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 Teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
  • 1/2 Teaspoon garam masala
  • 1/2 Teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 Teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Kosher salt
  • 8 Ounces container shucked oysters
  • 4 Cups seafood stock
  • 4 Ounces andouille sausage, cut into 1/2 inch dice
  • 8 Ounces medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1/4 Cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 scallion, white and green parts, finely chopped
  • hot cooked rice, for serving

Servings6

Calories Per Serving322

Folate equivalent (total)68µg17%

Riboflavin (B2)0.3mg19.4%


Recipes

Peel and de-vein the shrimp, and set aside, covered in the refrigerator. Rinse the shrimp shells and heads, place in a non-reactive stock pot along with 2 quarts of water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 30 - 45 minutes to make a stock. Strain, discard the shells and heads and set the stock aside. Meanwhile, wash the crabs well under running water, place in a non-reactive pot with 1 quart of water, bring to a boil and simmer for 20 - 30 minutes. Strain, reserving stock and crabs. When the crabs are cool enough to handle, snap both claws off then break the body in half. Set aside.

In a heavy bottomed skillet, heat 2 tablespoons of oil , add the okra and saute over medium high heat for about 10 - 15 minutes or until all the "ropiness" is gone. This step may take a little longer if fresh okra is used. Frozen vegetables are usually plunged into boiling water and blanched before freezing, so they are partially cooked.

Place the _ cup oil in a large (8 quart) heavy bottomed non-reactive Dutch oven type pot. Add the flour and, over a medium high fire, make a dark brown roux as described on page10. As soon as the proper color is achieved, add the onions, bell pepper, celery and garlic and saute, stirring occasionally until tender. During this process, allow the vegetables to stick to the bottom of the pan a bit, then scrape the bottom with a metal spoon or spatula. This allows some of the natural sugars in the onions to caramelize, rendering great depth of flavor.

When the seasoning vegetables are tender add the tomatoes, bay leaves and the three peppers and a little salt. Cook for about 10 minutes, repeating the stick and scrape process with the tomatoes. Add the sauteed okra and cook for 10 more minutes.

Add the crab stock and half of the shrimp stock to the pot. Stirring constantly, bring the pot to a boil. Lower the heat a bit, partially cover and simmer for thirty minutes, stirring occasionally. If the gumbo appears too thick, add more stock to adjust. Add salt to taste and adjust the pepper if desired. Add the broken crabs and simmer for about 10 minutes. Add the peeled shrimp, return to a boil and simmer until the shrimp are firm and pink, about 5 minutes. Remove the pot from heat.

As is the case with most gumbos, this dish is best prepared either early in the day it is to be served, or even the day before, thereby allowing time for the flavors to marry. When reheating, stir often and be careful to avoid overcooking the shrimp.

Serve in large bowls over steamed rice. This recipe will yield about six entrees or ten to twelve appetizers.


Cajun Seafood Gumbo with Andouille Smoked Sausage

Rating: 0
  • Description: Merlotte's is a rockin' roadhouse, where the waitress outfits can be described only as "Southern Hooters" and patrons consume more alcohol than food. Who can blame them, being at the front line of the vampire-rights movement in Bon Temps, La.?

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups chopped green bell pepper

1 tablespoon minced garlic

5 ½ cups seafood stock (see note)

1 pound andouille smoked sausage or other, such as Polish sausage, cut into ½-inch pieces

1 pound peeled medium shrimp

1 dozen medium to large oysters in their liquor, about 9 ounces, or canned clams

¾ pound crabmeat (picked over see note)

For seasoning mix:

½ teaspoon ground red pepper (preferably cayenne)

½ teaspoon dried thyme leaves

¼ teaspoon dried oregano leaves

Preparation:

In medium-size bowl, combine onions, bell peppers and celery.

In large heavy skillet, heat oil over high heat until it begins to smoke, about 5 minutes. Gradually add flour, whisking constantly with a long-handled metal whisk. Continue cooking, whisking constantly, until roux is dark red-brown to black, about 2 to 4 minutes, being careful not to let it scorch or splash on your skin. Immediately add half the vegetables and stir well (switch to a spoon if necessary). Continue stirring and cooking about 1 minute. Add remaining vegetables and cook, stirring, about 2 minutes. Stir in seasoning mix and continue cooking about 2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add garlic stir well, then cook and stir about 1 minute more. Remove from heat.

Meanwhile, place stock in 5&ensp½-quart saucepan or large Dutch oven. Bring to a boil. Add roux mixture by spoonfuls to the boiling stock, stirring until dissolved between each addition. Bring mixture to a boil. Add andouille and return to a boil continue boiling 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes more. Add shrimp, undrained oysters and crabmeat. Return to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat and skim any oil from the surface. Serve immediately.

To serve as a main course, mound ¼ cup rice in the middle of each serving bowl. Spoon 1 cup gumbo over the top, making sure each person gets an assortment of the seafood and andouille. For appetizer servings, serve half this amount in a cup.

Note: Seafood stock is available at high-end food stores and larger supermarkets.

Seasoning mix:

In small bowl, mix all ingredients well.

Notes:Crabmeat can be omitted without sacrificing flavor. More shrimp can be added in its place. Seafood stock concentrate can be purchased we found it at Grasch's.


Seafood and Okra Gumbo

Seafood gumbo, made with shrimp, lots of crab, and usually oysters is definitely a Deep South tradition for Christmas. Mama always made her seafood gumbo on Christmas Eve and that was a tradition at our house. We had this yesterday (and of course it only gets better the day after) and oh my gosh. this is so dang good (if I don't say so myself), I can't begin to tell y'all!

Don't get me wrong. we eat plenty of gumbo around here - and plenty of that is shrimp gumbo. But seafood gumbo - meaning one that contains not only shrimp, but oysters and crab too (not chicken!), generally only shows up either at special Sunday Suppers, big events like the Super Bowl, or major holidays like Christmas or New Year's. Even here right on the Gulf of Mexico where crabs are plentiful, buyin' good lump crab at the store already picked, cleaned and steamed is not a cheap venture, and oysters depend on just how the season went. The oysters I used were fresh right out of the Gulf of Mexico and shucked by my paw-in-law himself. so good. Yes, I know. I am such a blessed gal. Let's make some gumbo!

Southern Style Hissy Fit Warning: First, I do want to say one thing about roux, that I've repeated on all of my gumbo posts. Roux can be brought anywhere from very blonde, to light tan for gravies, to peanut butter colored, or more ruddy, like a copper penny, to chocolaty brown, to deep brown, to nearly black - or anywhere in between. Bottom line is that it's really a personal preference and don't let anybody tell you otherwise. A gumbo roux does not have to be nearly black. That's just simply not true. While some chefs may do that, I don't know many who do that in a home kitchen.

For one, it weakens the thickening power of your roux substantially and makes for a very thin gumbo. For another, it's very robust and very strong flavored. For another, it can take a very long time and is easy to burn if you try to rush it with high heat. If you like that kind of bold (or if you're cooking something like wild duck), by all means, take it super dark. Most folks I know don't want that flavor for a simple chicken or seafood gumbo and take the roux anywhere from peanut butter colored to a slightly darker brown. While we are here let me add, if you're gonna put crab in your seafood gumbo, and you want to call it authentic to the Gulf Coast region, it's blue crab. Not snow crab. And not lobster either.

As always with any gumbo, as delicious as it is day 1, it's even better the next day, so make it ahead whenever you can.


For more of my favorite gumbo recipes, visit my page on Pinterest!

If you make this or any of my recipes, I'd love to see your results! Just snap a photo and hashtag it #DeepSouthDish on social media or tag me @deepsouthdish on Instagram!

Recipe: Seafood and Okra Gumbo

  • 3/4 cup dark oven roux *
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • 1 cup chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 1 ( 15 ounce ) can stewed tomatoes , with liquid, chopped up
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun seasoning (like Slap Ya Mama) , or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon Old Bay seasoning
  • 2 quarts shrimp stock , chicken stock/broth or water
  • 1/2 tablespoon cooking oil (canola, vegetable)
  • 1/2 pound smoked sausage , andouille or ham, chopped (optional)
  • 1 pound sliced okra
  • 2 pounds medium shrimp , peeled and deveined
  • 2 dozen oysters , undrained
  • 1 pound lump crabmeat , picked through for any shell
  • Hot sauce

Warm the roux over medium high heat in a large heavy bottom pot, stirring constantly. Add the onion, celery and green pepper to the hot roux, cooking and stirring for about 3-4 minutes. Stir in garlic and remove the pot from the heat.

Chop the tomatoes, reserving the liquid. I use a pair of kitchen shears to chop them up right in the can. Add the tomatoes to roux mixture and return pot to heat. Add the Cajun seasoning and Old Bay. Stir in the shrimp stock, chicken broth or water return to a boil, reduce heat to just under medium, and let simmer covered for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, add the cooking oil to a separate skillet, and heat over medium heat. Add the sausage and cook until browned. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain. To that same skillet, add the okra cook and stir until slightly browned. Using a slotted spoon, transfer from the skillet to the gumbo pot. Add the sausage and cover the pot continue simmering.

Add the shrimp to the gumbo pot. Cover the pot and continue simmering, about 10 minutes. Add the oysters simmer another 5 minutes. Pick through the crabmeat checking for any remnants of shells gently stir the crabmeat into the gumbo, until just heated through.

Serve over hot cooked rice and sprinkle individual bowls with gumbo filé, if desired. Pass a bottle of Tabasco for some extra kick and add some hot, buttered French bread or rolls and a side salad.

Cook's Notes: Gumbo is a dish that only improves with advance preparation, so make it ahead of time if possible. The flavors really need time to settle and mellow. It's always better the next day. Prepare, let cool and skim any accumulated oil off the top before storing. If you don't already have an oven roux made, just combine 3/4 cup each cooking oil and all purpose flour and cook over medium high heat, stirring constantly until roux reaches a deep, dark color.

Gumbo filé, or filé powder, is a seasoning made from ground sassafras leaves and tastes a bit like savory and thyme mixed together. It is often stirred into gumbo at the end of cooking (but never boiled) to act as a thickener when okra is out of season. Besides thickening it also imparts a unique flavor to the gumbo, so even when using okra I like to sprinkle a little into each serving bowl. Do not add it to the pot if you don’t expect to finish off the gumbo as it does not reheat well and will become stringy.

Creamy Seafood Gumbo: Double the okra, adding half of it, uncooked, with the tomatoes and stock/broth or water for the first simmer. Allow base to thicken, then proceed with recipe.

Check These Recipes Out Too Y'all!

Images and Full Post Content including Recipe ©Deep South Dish. Recipes are offered for your own personal use only and while pinning and sharing links is welcomed and encouraged, please do not copy and paste to repost or republish elsewhere such as other Facebook pages, blogs, websites, or forums without explicit prior permission. All rights reserved.


Gallery

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ¾ cup bacon drippings
  • 1 cup coarsely chopped celery
  • 1 large onion, coarsely chopped
  • 1 large green bell pepper, coarsely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 pound andouille sausage, sliced
  • 3 quarts water
  • 6 cubes beef bouillon
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • salt to taste
  • 2 tablespoons hot pepper sauce (such as Tabasco®), or to taste
  • ½ teaspoon Cajun seasoning blend (such as Tony Chachere's®), or to taste
  • 4 bay leaves
  • ½ teaspoon dried thyme leaves
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can stewed tomatoes
  • 1 (6 ounce) can tomato sauce
  • 4 teaspoons file powder, divided
  • 2 tablespoons bacon drippings
  • 2 (10 ounce) packages frozen cut okra, thawed
  • 2 tablespoons distilled white vinegar
  • 1 pound lump crabmeat
  • 3 pounds uncooked medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

Make a roux by whisking the flour and 3/4 cup bacon drippings together in a large, heavy saucepan over medium-low heat to form a smooth mixture. Cook the roux, whisking constantly, until it turns a rich mahogany brown color. This can take 20 to 30 minutes watch heat carefully and whisk constantly or roux will burn. Remove from heat continue whisking until mixture stops cooking.

Place the celery, onion, green bell pepper, and garlic into the work bowl of a food processor, and pulse until the vegetables are very finely chopped. Stir the vegetables into the roux, and mix in the sausage. Bring the mixture to a simmer over medium-low heat, and cook until vegetables are tender, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from heat, and set aside.

Bring the water and beef bouillon cubes to a boil in a large Dutch oven or soup pot. Stir until the bouillon cubes dissolve, and whisk the roux mixture into the boiling water. Reduce heat to a simmer, and mix in the sugar, salt, hot pepper sauce, Cajun seasoning, bay leaves, thyme, stewed tomatoes, and tomato sauce. Simmer the soup over low heat for 1 hour mix in 2 teaspoons of file gumbo powder at the 45-minute mark.

Meanwhile, melt 2 tablespoons of bacon drippings in a skillet, and cook the okra with vinegar over medium heat for 15 minutes remove okra with slotted spoon, and stir into the simmering gumbo. Mix in crabmeat, shrimp, and Worcestershire sauce, and simmer until flavors have blended, 45 more minutes. Just before serving, stir in 2 more teaspoons of file gumbo powder.


Shrimp and Andouille Gumbo with Okra

Delish. But, admittedly, homemade gumbo can take a bit of time between planning and preparing, though there are ways that you can save some time and make it an easier process when you get in the mood for gumbo. Next time you are chopping an onion, go ahead and chop an extra one or two and bag it in a zipper freezer bag. When you make rice for one dinner, double up on it and then bag and freeze half. All it needs is a sprinkle of water, cover and microwave to freshen it up. For okra, pre-sliced frozen okra works fantastic.

If you don't have shell on shrimp or just don't feel up to making a stock from the shrimp shells, next time you bake a whole chicken, save the carcass and make homemade chicken stock, cool it and bag it in freezer bags by 1 or 2 cup measurements. Chicken stock or broth works great for gumbo, as does plain ole water, or even a combination of the two.

One of the biggest time savers I use now for making gumbo is a homemade, pre-made and refrigerated dark roux - yes, just like you see on the grocery store shelf - and you can certainly use those here too. But I'm talking about making your own dark roux ahead, at a cost savings, right in your own kitchen, and then storing it in your fridge. And, get this. You make it in your oven. Yes! It really does work. The oven method works fantastic, you don't have to keep standing over a pot of hot oil and stir your arm off, and you can make up a big batch and store it in your fridge. If you like to make up a pot of gumbo frequently, whether it be seafood or chicken, try the oven method sometime to put up your own roux, you will love it!

Other than The Trinity, I use a little thyme and Cajun seasoning for seasoning this gumbo, and generally nothing else. My favorite brand is Slap Ya Mama which comes in regular, white pepper and hot, and if you live locally, is available at Winn Dixie, Walmart and Rouse's market, among others. The white pepper blend, which I love using in gumbo, is a blend of salt, white and red pepper and garlic. If you don't have access to that brand, just substitute Zatarain's, or Tony's, or whatever your favorite blend is.

There are two camps of gumbo when it comes to tomatoes - a rich dark roux with no tomatoes, and one that does include tomatoes. While I don't typically add them to my chicken gumbo, I tend to include tomatoes when I make a seafood gumbo, though you can certainly reduce them and even leave them out. And, by the way, I'm not super endeared to any one gumbo recipe, so if you try one of mine that you like, save it, because I'm more likely than not to mess with it on down the line.

Look at that gorgeous roux! This one was made in the oven, taking away that stand-over, stirring time and producing a wonderful roux. If using a roux made ahead, simply warm it over medium high heat in a large, heavy bottomed Dutch oven or stockpot, stirring constantly. I used my cast iron Dutch oven. You can, of course, just start a fresh roux right on the stovetop as well, which is how most folks do it.

Add the onion, bell pepper and celery to the hot roux cook, stirring constantly until tender, about 3-4 minutes. Reduce heat to low.

Chop the tomatoes, reserving all the liquid. I use a pair of kitchen shears to chop them up right in the can. Add the tomatoes with their liquid to roux mixture. Add Cajun seasoning and thyme. Stir in the stock/broth or water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to just under medium, and let simmer covered for 30 minutes.

Stir in the shrimp, chicken broth or water return to a boil, reduce heat to just under medium, and let simmer covered for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, add the cooking oil to a separate skillet, and heat over medium heat. I like to use andouille sausage, which is a highly spiced smoked sausage that is blended with Cajun spices, adding a spicy kick and great flavor to these dishes. If you substitute kielbasa or other smoked sausages in recipes where it calls for Andouille, it will affect the outcome of your dish and you’ll need to make adjustments in the seasonings you use to make up for that flavor. Add the sausage and cook until browned. Remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to the gumbo pot. To that same skillet, add the okra cook and stir until slightly browned. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the okra to the gumbo pot continue simmering.

Add the raw shrimp to the pot and allow it to simmer a few minutes until the shrimp are pink and cooked through. Taste, add salt and pepper, only if needed, and adjust Cajun seasoning to taste.

Serve over hot cooked rice and pass a bottle of Tabasco for some extra kick. Add some hot, buttered French bread or rolls and some creamy gumbo potato salad, or a side salad to round out the meal.

A delicious shrimp and okra gumbo made in a good ole cast iron Dutch oven.

Southern Style Hissy Fit Warning: I do want to say one thing about roux, that I've repeated on all of my gumbo posts. Roux can be brought anywhere from very blonde, to light tan for gravies, to peanut butter colored, or more ruddy, like a copper penny, to chocolaty brown, to deep brown, to nearly black - or anywhere in between for gumbo. Bottom line is that it's really a personal preference and don't let anybody tell you that a gumbo roux has to be nearly black. That's just simply not true. While some chefs may do that, I don't know anybody who does that in a home kitchen.

For one, it weakens the thickening power of your roux substantially and makes for a very thin gumbo. For another, it's very robust and very strong flavored. For another, it can take a very long time and is easy to burn if you try to rush it with high heat. If you like that kind of bold (or if you're cooking something like wild duck), by all means, take it super dark. Most folks I know don't want that flavor for a simple chicken or seafood gumbo and take the roux from peanut butter colored to a slightly darker brown. While we are here, let me add, if you're gonna put crab in your seafood gumbo, and you want to call it authentic to the Gulf Coast region, it's blue crab. Not snow crab.

As always with any gumbo, as delicious as it is day 1, it's even better the next day, so make it ahead whenever you can.

For more of my gumbo recipes, check out my page on Pinterest!

If you make this or any of my recipes, I'd love to see your results! Just snap a photo and hashtag it #DeepSouthDish on social media or tag me @deepsouthdish on Instagram!

Recipe: Shrimp and Andouille Gumbo with Okra

  • 2 pounds medium small (51/60 to 41/50) raw gumbo shrimp , peeled and deveined
  • 1 cup cooking oil
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/2 cups chopped onion
  • 1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped celery
  • 1 (14.5 ounce) can stewed tomatoes , with liquid, chopped up, optional
  • 3 quarts shrimp or chicken stock/broth, water , or any combination
  • 1 to 2 teaspoons Cajun seasoning (like Slap Ya Mama), or to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon thyme
  • 1/2 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 1/2 pound mild andouille or other spicy smoked sausage , chopped
  • 1 pound sliced okra
  • Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper , as needed, to taste
  • Hot sauce , (like Tabasco), for the table, optional

Peel and devein shrimp refrigerate until needed. Prepare roux by heating 1 cup of oil over medium high heat and stirring in flour until blended in. Continue cooking, stirring constantly until roux is fragrant and dark brown in color. Add the onion, bell pepper and celery to the hot roux cook, stirring constantly until tender, about 3-4 minutes. Reduce heat to low.

Chop the tomatoes, if using, reserving all the liquid. I use a pair of kitchen shears to chop them up right in the can. Add the tomatoes with their liquid to roux mixture. Add Cajun seasoning and thyme. Stir in the stock/broth or water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to just under medium, and let simmer covered for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, add the 1/2 tablespoon of cooking oil to a large skillet, and heat over medium heat. Add the sausage and cook until browned. Remove with a slotted spoon and transfer to the gumbo pot. To that same skillet, add the okra cook and stir until slightly browned. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the okra to the gumbo pot continue simmering.

Add the raw shrimp to the pot and allow it to simmer a few minutes until the shrimp are pink and cooked through. Taste, add salt and pepper, only if needed, and adjust Cajun seasoning to taste. Serve over hot cooked rice and pass a bottle of Tabasco for some extra kick. Add some hot, buttered French bread or rolls and some creamy gumbo potato salad, or a side salad to round out the meal.

Tip: If you're lucky enough to have some leftover crab, clean about 4 medium sized ones and cut bodies into halves or quarters. Add them in with the sausage.

Cook's Notes: The addition of some tomato is a personal preference, though I almost always add it to my seafood gumbos. Gumbo is a dish that only improves with advance preparation, so make it ahead of time whenever possible. The flavors really need time to settle and mellow and it's always better the next day. Prepare, let cool and skim any accumulated oil off the top before storing. Use more roux for a thicker gumbo, or adjust your stock using more for a thinner gumbo less if you like it thicker. You can also make a roux using your microwave, your oven, or use a commercial product.

Creamy Shrimp Gumbo: Double the okra, adding half of it, uncooked, with the tomatoes and stock/broth or water for the first simmer. Allow base to thicken, then proceed with recipe.

Check These Recipes Out Too Y'all!

Images and Full Post Content including Recipe ©Deep South Dish. Recipes are offered for your own personal use and while pinning and sharing links is welcomed and encouraged, please do not copy and paste to repost or republish elsewhere such as other Facebook pages, blogs, websites, or forums without explicit prior permission. All rights reserved.


I can smell the seafood goodness coming through my phone. Too bad I can only get 1/3 of those ingredients where I live

Oh, that sucks! Perhaps there's some alternatives that are similar no?

Andouille Sausage, 2 Links

Garlic, Fresh Minced 2 Tbsp

Parsley, Fresh Chopped 1/2 Cup

Green Onions, Chopped 2/3 Cup

Add Oil to pan and turn on medium heat.

Add flour and continue to stir, watching close, until the mixture (Roux) has turned a dark chocolate color.F

Add Onions, Bell Pepper and Celery and stir until translucent.

Add Sausage, mix together for 3 minutes.

Add Spices and stir together.

Slowly add stock, stirring all the time. Add Bayleaves and fresh Garlic.

Turn the heat down to a low roll and cover.

Allow to simmer like this for 90 Minutes.

While simmering organize rice and any other side dishes.

Add Crab, Shrimp, Crab Meat, Green Onion and Parsley and bring back to a boil. Cook on a slow roll for 15 minutes. Turn off heat.

If you like a spicier Gumbo replace smoked sausage with andouille sausage, making it 4 Links of Andouille and add another TBSP of Creole Seasoning.

I like to peel about 70% of the shrimp before I put in, this way most won't need peeling while you're eating but you still get the flavor from the shrimp shell from the remaining 30%.

The stock is flexible, you can use all Seafood, or all Chicken - I just like the blend of both.


Use real butter

Recipe: seafood andouille gumbo

Thanks to all of the good folks who entered to win a Wii console and a Wii Fit Plus package! While we normally have Kaweah pick our giveaway winners, we gave her a break this time. Actually, it’s because we weren’t sure if the Kaweah Method would pass muster with the law-talkin’ guys at Nintendo. But honestly, if you’ve ever met Kaweah, you’d realize right away that she is truly random.

truly



So let’s get on with it! Random.org gave us 393 out of 516 comments. Our winner is comment #393 – Karna! Congratulations Karna! I’ll contact you via email to get your mailing address so Nintendo can FedEx your cool and exciting new system to you! I have to say I was really impressed that so many of you want to get active and fit. Even if you didn’t win the system, I still encourage you to get out there and do something. Whether you buy a Wii of your own or just start walking with friends, doing some exercises in your own home, trying out some yoga classes, or signing up for some sports teams to get you engaged and moving – it’s good for you. I’m cheering you on from here!

I was feeling pretty good on Friday, then had a big crash and burn Saturday (I am told it is not uncommon to hit a wall on the third day after surgery). Reality never seems to be able to keep up with the plans I have in my head. By the way, thanks for all of your sweet recovery wishes. I think I’m finally on the mend. At least I was feeling good enough for us to run a few errands in town and meet up with friends at The Kitchen Upstairs (part of The Kitchen) for Tasting Hour.

jeremy tried a flight

two of my favorite things: food and friends



Cold, fat rain drops plopped on my head as we stepped into a gray and wet Pearl Street. I like the rain. I guess I wasn’t this enthusiastic about it when I lived in Ithaca, NY. There is such a thing as too much rain. Here in the West, the rain is a nice change up from our typical gorgeous and sunny weather. Boulder is right at the transition into Spring where that bright green fuzz you see on the trees will burst into full on leaves in the next week. I drove us home in the rain, then the slush, then the snow. When we let Kaweah out for the night, it was snowing at a good clip.

takes my breath away every time i see it



What better weather for a hot bowl of gumbo? I’ve had this recipe dog-eared for a long time and I figured I’d make it when I thought to look for fresh okra. Lo and behold, I found it at H-Mart last week! Considering that I don’t even know when okra season is, this was a magical thing. I grabbed a pound of the stuff. I call it the stuff because I’ve never cooked okra before and I’ve only had it on three occasions – once by accident (the NASA Langley cafeteria – that was interesting), once in a sushi bar (tempura fried, can anything be bad if it is tempura fried?), and once pickled because my friend Melinda is crazy about pickled okra.

onion, pepper, green onions, okra, tomatoes

okra looks happy, doesn’t it?



I set about gathering shrimp and crab and andouille sausage. Nothing gets me going like a hearty spicy stew. I chose this recipe because I had never made shrimp stock before. It looked intriguing. I love using scraps to make more food and the stock was simple water, the shrimp shells, the celery trimmings, and the onion skin. Nice.

shelling and deveining the shrimp

let’s make shrimp stock



The original recipe called for oysters, but I wanted andouille sausage – so I ousted the oysters for the andouille because I thought both would be too much. Plus, I didn’t really see any good fresh oysters in the stores.

crab, shrimp, and andouille



The broth was golden and aromatic, which got me really excited about the gumbo. I can’t tell you how many times I wanted to ditch the photos and finish making the dish so I could sit down and have a bowl. The recipe doesn’t actually take very long to make if you aren’t shooting it. Prep time and then an hour at most for cooking?

frying the okra

pre-cook both the sausage and okra



A lot of people have an aversion to okra because it is slimy. I guess it *is* slimy, but I like it. To reduce the sliminess, the recipe suggests frying up the okra slices until they are browned. Supposedly this cuts down on the unpleasant texture. My take on it is that the browning can only add more flavor to the gumbo – so why not? I browned the andouille too because that’s a no-brainer.

make the roux

sauté onions, celery, and peppers



Everything up to this point was prep. You really start with a roux. I cooked my roux to a nice caramel color and added the onions per the instructions. They said it would turn a chocolate brown. I waited a long time and it still looked like caramel. At this point, my kitchen was a mess, I had flour on my camera, and I was getting cranky. I called it good and moved on. See what food blogging does to your culinary standards?

stirring in the broth and other goodies

just before serving, add the shrimp and crab



The rest was easy though. Add the broth, vegetables, sausage, and seasonings. Simmer. Stir in the lovely seafood. Kaweah kept walking into the kitchen raising her schnoz high in the air to get a whiff. White rice is the traditional accompaniment, but we’ve moved to mostly short grain brown rice here. Place a scoop of rice in the bowl, ladle that gumbo goodness on top and you have Happy in a Bowl right there. Don’t forget the extra hot sauce on the side!

ladle over rice



I was already enamored with the recipe from the moment I strained the shrimp broth. When I served it to Jeremy, I thought he might balk at the okra, but he loved it – all of it. Now I just need to find a proper supply of okra.

gumbo yum-bo



Seafood Andouille Gumbo
[print recipe]
modified from Fine Cooking issue #90: Poppy Tooker’s Seafood Gumbo

1.5 lbs. medium shrimp with shells on (or 2 lbs. medium shrimp with heads on)
2 cups onion, medium dice (about 1 large onion, reserve the skin)
1 cup celery, medium dice (2-3 stalks, reserve the trimmings)
1/4 cup + 6 tbsps vegetable oil
1 lb. fresh or frozen (thawed) okra, sliced 1/4-inch thick (about 4 cups)
1/2 cup flour
1 cup green bell pepper, diced
1 cup canned crushed tomatoes
1/2 lb. fresh or pasteurized lump crabmeat
1 tbsp dried thyme
1 bay leaf
2 tsps kosher salt
1 tsp black pepper, freshly ground
8 oz. andouille sausage, diced (here Poppy calls for shucked oysters, but I didn’t have them and I prefer andouille – thus the substitution)
1/2 cup green onions, thinly sliced
Louisiana-style hot sauce, to taste
1/4 cup hot cooked white rice per serving (I used short-grain brown rice)

Shrimp Stock: Peel the shrimp (remove heads and devein as necessary). Place the shrimp in the refrigerator until you are ready to use them. Combine the shrimp peels and heads with the onion skin and celery trimmings in a large pot. Cover with 9 cups of cold water over high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce to an active simmer and let cook uncovered for 10 minutes. Strain and reserve the broth (about 2 quarts).

Okra: Heat 1/4 cup of vegetable oil in a wide sauté pan. Sauté the okra until the edges become lightly browned (about 3-5 minutes). Let them sit for the first two minutes or so until they brown, then start tossing them over to brown evenly. Drain of any extra oil and set aside.

Andouille: In the same pan as you used for the okra, heat the sausage on high and stir around until the sides have browned. Remove to a bowl and set aside.

Heat 6 tablespoons of vegetable oil in a large pot or Dutch oven. When it’s hot, add the flour and stir with a wooden utensil or heatproof spatula until the roux becomes caramel colored. This takes about 5 minutes. Toss in the onions and stir until the mixture becomes chocolate brown in color (mine never achieved this color – it was more like light brown). Add celery, pepper and cook for another 5 minutes or until soft. Pour in the shrimp stock, okra, tomatoes, thyme, bay leaf, salt, pepper, and andouille. Reduce heat to a simmer and let simmer uncovered for 45 minutes. Five minutes before serving, stir in the shrimp, the lump crabmeat, and green onions. Add hot sauce, salt, and pepper to taste. Spoon gumbo over 1/4 cup of cooked rice per serving. Makes 3 quarts. Serves 6 to 8.

43 nibbles at “seafood andouille gumbo”

Kaweah is so precious. Love that photo! Congrats to the winner. Glad you are feeling better. Good food and friends are the cure all!

As a half-cajun (mom’s side) I HEART GUMBO. She usually makes a chicken/sausage kind but once we made some with dungeness crab meat from Seattle. Delicious….

this recipe looks AWESOME!

in NC, okra season is the dead of summer–so a good supply should be on the way in the next few months. it’s good battered with egg and cornmeal and fried in bacon fat and pepper, which is how my grandfather always made it–he’d slice it, shake it in a paper bag with the egg, pepper, salt, and cornmeal and fry it on super-high heat. very tasty, but not great FOR you, or course. it’s also fantastic tossed with a tiny amount of olive oil and roasted with a little salt, and a boatload black or cayenne pepper. roast on 425 for 5 min a side, just till it’s starting to get soft. yum.

That looks awesome! I love okra never understood the objections to it.

So glad you’re feeling better.

The weather is warming up here in LA (FINALLY), but that gumbo looks amazing for a frosty day! Glad you’re feeling better too!

Congrats to the winner. So lucky!

I don’t like gumbo, but your gumbo looks fantastic!

I’m bookmarking this. I’ve been missing NOLA cuisine ever since I went last summer — I’m sure this will hit the spot. Thanks.

Congrats to the winner! Hope you feel better every day!
I love your photos and blog, as always….I am especially impressed by the uniform celery, onion and pepper dice!
jill

Kaweah is just melting my heart in that photo!

Where did you find okra this time of year? I live in Maryland and have to grow my own to get good quality but it means having it in July/Aug. I’m so jealous, former GA girl that loves okra. P.S. Kawaeh is a beautiful dog.

my wisconsin-born texas heart is homesick at the photo off your balcony. so impressive and idyllic. that okra shot is fantastic, too!

This looks fantastic – I love gumbo. Never had it with okra though… you may have inspired me.

I love okra, but I usually have to buy it frozen – our summers aren’t long enough to grow it. It’s wonderful pan-fried with spices, deep fried, pickled…and yet I’ve never made gumbo. I should do something about that.

I just had some pickled okra Sunday. Love it. A little heat is good in it.

I really could get fit if I would just stop eating!

Poor Kaweah looks so sad at being left out of the action this time :( The gumbo looks great, though.

Summer! I’m so excited that means more beautiful photos from you :)
I think the brown roux of gumbo is really supposed to happen after a few hours, yikes. (I’m not sure if I’m thinking of another recipe.) It’s nice to know that it still looks and taste good even skipping that step :)

I have the same beautiful lab eyes sitting right next to my desk. They are the best. Love the pictures.

K girl! Oh I missed that face. Jen my love I have neglected you. I’m headed back through the blog now but wanted to say that I’m sorry I’ve been gone, and mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm gumbo! Have made your au gratin potatoes, beef stir fry, and darling flank steak all in the last two weeks! Been thinking of you…

My very stable supply of okra is frozen from the Indian grocers. Gumbo looks fab and your dog is so precious.

Kaweah is so cute! And your pictures look gumbolicious. Glad you are better.

I couldn’t be more excited! And in a post about gumbo, my mom’s signature dish. Perfect it every way! : )

Can you come to my house and cook? JK! You are SO awesome. Amazing recepies, amazing photos!

My mom’s from Louisiana, so I grew up on gumbo. We always put some roasted sweet potato in the bowl with the rice, and then poured the gumbo on top. The sweet/spicy combo is great!

Delicious!! Made it for tonight supper. Thanks for sharing… TP

I would recommend sticking to yankee dishes and leave the gumbo cooking to us southerners. The cooking of the roux to a chocolate brown is the most integral part of making a proper gumbo. Cutting this process short because you were cranky sounds absolutely ridiculous.

John – us southerners? I grew up in the south. I just never cooked gumbo. But listen here, I have a recommendation for you. Why don’t you keep your unconstructive, negative, and rude comments to yourself? Asshole.

John: you’re an insult to the term “Southern hospitality”…well just “Southerner” really.

Jen…keep on rocking. I’ll eat your gumbo and I am another Southerner…oh and Bill said he’ll eat your gumbo and his daddy and his mommy. That’s four Southerners.

Nice site! Ignore John, he sounds cranky himself. Here in New Orleans we have a saying, “There are as many recipes for gumbo as there are cooks that make it” (Entirely true). That said, I have a long a sorted history of making gumbos (my “victims” include actual Brittish Royalty and the Outback Bowl Committee) and can offer a few tips that will make your next gumbo even better than the last.

– Roux takes patience. Always use fresh flour (roux from old flour breaks) and approximately an equal portion of oil (never olive oil. ). For seafood, cook the roux to a nice dark peanut butter-ish brown. If you are making a meat gumbo (turkey, chicken, duck, etc.) cook the roux to a light chocolate color. It takes about three beers to get a good roux that matches the bottle.

– Always use stock! When I make duck or chicken gumbo, I’ll roast the bird and capture the rendered fat. Then I’ll use the roasted bird to make the stock and the rendered fat to make the roux. People who think pork fat rules, only think that because they haven’t had duck fat yet.

– This is REALLY important. Make gumbo in advance, like a day or two before you need it. Make sure you let the stock-roux-veg mix cook for two-plus hours. Let the flavors “marry” in the fridge and reheat. If you are using seafood, hold it back until the last 10-15 minutes before serving. If you are cooking poultry or meat, just cook the bejeezus out of it.

– Another tip I can offer that will surely cause controversy in the gumbo universe- It is my strongly held opinion that all gumbo contains roux (recipes for “roux-less” gumbos are heresy), but only seafood gumbo contains okra and only meat gumbo contains file’ (sassafras, for the uninitiated).

– Frozen okra is perfectly acceptable in gumbo.

– Turkey gumbo made with the carcass of a roasted turkey from Thanksgiving ROCKS! It is one of the least appreciated New Orleans dishes.

– Also, a small squeeze of lemon add a touch of acidity to soften the roux.

– Louisiana Jasmine long grain rice is the sine qua non rice for gumbo. Add a scoop on top of the bowl at serving.

May your skillet be hot and your beer stay cold,

Jackie – mmm, thanks! that sounds faboo!

Pam – at the Asian market. Of course, later that afternoon I was told by my boys at the Whole Foods Seafood counter that they just got fresh okra in the produce section *doh*

Manggy – holy hell… no wonder. I figured the heat output from my range was wankered again.

Mollie – no worries, hon. Good to know you’re still around! xo

Helene – ahhh lady, you always have my back. xo

David in NOLA – um, I think I’m in love with you. Thank you for that amazing rundown of tips and information. I truly appreciate your generous and witty delivery too. The beauty of cooking is the sharing. Thank you for that. What I really want to know is… which British royalty and what the heck is the Outback Bowl Committee? ) You’re awesome. xo

Re: “um, I think I’m in love with you.” – You had me at “real butter”.

If you do not have “Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient, with Recipes” by Jennifer McLagan in your kitchen library, you should put it at the top of your wish list. It is a really good book for people aren’t scared to live a little.

The Brittish Royalty is a long story, but the short version is that I prepared a large turkey gumbo for a very affluent friend who was co-hosting a New Year’s Eve Party a few years ago. The commander of the Brittish Forces from the first Gulf War (Sir Charles- or something like that) was in attendance. He and his wife had never had gumbo and were very taken by it. They asked my friend if they could hire her “personal chef” (i.e. me) for a dinner party. She told them that I was not available for hire and I have yet to forgive her.

The Outback Bowl is one of the college football bowl games. They have a committee that travels and evaluates colleges towards the end of the season for potential bowl bids. I ended up making a Duck and Andouille gumbo for them once.

I believe that you can see my e-mail address from my reply form. If you send me an e-mail, I will send you a series of pictures that will provide you benchmarks for your rouxs.

Also, I have been selected as a finalist in Gambit Magazine’s contest to develop a new recipe to promote Jazzmen Louisiana Rice. Online voting ends today. If you are willing, I’d appreciate your support for my Crispy Jazzmen Rice Cakes in Crawfish-Tasso Cream.

Voting registers you a chance to win a commercial blender… just sayin’

From another Louisiana native, I’d like to say thank you. I’ve never mastered seafood gumbo, perhaps because as David said – there are so many versions out there. (and I agree whole-heartedly, gumbo is best the next day.)

I tried your recipe using some very dark roux that was stored in the fridge (from a previous attempt), and it was delicious! I did brown the okra, and I do think it helped w/the “slime” factor. My only change was to use cayenne pepper, garlic, and cook a little longer to thicken the gumbo (my preference.)

Here’s a roux trick: brown the flour in the oven, and store it dry in the freezer. It gives you a great head start on the roux and you can then darken it depending on the recipe.

I feel like you look through my freezer and pantry before posting these! I had shrimp casings in my freezer from a recent batch of gulf shrimp we scampied, some spicy sausage waiting to be used, and a tub of lump crabmeat. Combine that with the onions our neighbor gave us this morning and a head of cauliflower with lots of leafy greens on it, and my stock is smelling delicious. Thanks for the inspiration, cannot wait to taste the final product!

This looks fantastic!! For all that seafood goodness, this is simple awesome! And great for the weather you are enjoying!

orrobbins – thanks, what a great tip! I’ll be sure to use it next time I roll up my sleeves and make roux :)

[…] Seafood Andouille Gumbo (from use real butter) […]

This looks scrumptious! Those pics–ohmygawsh. I’m going to make seafood stock out of leftover crab legs and looking for recipes. I’m in CO as well and am wondering about okra…I wonder if frozen will work? I saw it in the grocery store the other and almost bought some for the same reasons you mentioned (e.g., tempura!) Thanks!

Melanie – I think you can safely use frozen okra and it should still work. I saw there are some recipes online that call for frozen okra, just make sure they are thawed before cooking. Should be great! :)

I’ve been using your recipe now for 3 years and I LOVE IT! This go round I used a lobster base along with my shrimp stock and it turned out better than ever. I personally do not like real dark roux so this worked for me and actually the lobster base had darkened the gumbo. I’ve also added the gumbo file to my dish which gave it it’s finishing touch. You rock!

Paula – OMG, YOU rock. Wow, you are such a pro! Your modifications sound AMAZING. Thanks for the ideas and feedback xoxo


Shrimp, Chicken, and Andouille Gumbo

Heat oil in heavy 13-quart pot over medium-high heat until very hot and almost smoking. Add flour and stir constantly until mixture is dark reddish brown, about 5 minutes. Add chopped onions, chopped bell peppers, and chopped celery and cook until onions are soft and brown, stirring frequently, about 20 minutes. Add garlic and cayenne and stir 2 minutes. Add wine, thyme, and bay leaves bring to boil, stirring occasionally. Add tomatoes with juice, clam juice, broth, sausage, and chicken simmer until chicken is cooked through, about 15 minutes. Add okra and simmer until tender, about 10 minutes. DO AHEAD Gumbo base can be made 2 days ahead. Cool slightly. Chill uncovered until cold, then cover and keep chilled. Bring base to simmer before continuing.

Step 2

Add shrimp to pot and cook shrimp until just opaque in center, stirring often, about 5 minutes. Season gumbo to taste with salt and pepper. Garnish with minced parsley and serve with steamed rice alongside.


Directions

To Make Roux: In a small saucepan combine flour and oil mix well. Cook stirring constantly over medium high heat for 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium cook stirring constantly approximately 10 minutes or until mixture turns reddish brown.

To Make Gumbo: Place flour oil mixture in 4 quart Crock pot. Stir in sausage, okra, onion, bell pepper, celery, garlic, thyme, bay leaves, tomatoes, and fish stock. Cover and cook on low for 7 - 8.5 hours. Add crabmeat, crawfish, and oysters to the Crock pot. Cover and cook on low for an additional 30 minutes.

To Make Rice: Put water for rice in a pot on high. Once it is boiling add rice. Follow cook times on the package of rice. Serve Gumbo over rice

This recipe was originally created for someone who was allergic to shrimp but not other seafood. Therefore, you can substitute shrimp for the crawfish or add 1 package of frozen shrimp to the recipe if desired. The shrimp will be added to the Crock pot at the same time as the crawfish.

* If desired 2 tablespoons of gumbo file may be added to the recipe with the other seasonings.


Shrimp & Andouille Gumbo

This Shrimp and Andouille Gumbo recipe is one you’ll want to keep in the ole recipe box. Everything is made from scratch but you’ll find it’s quite an easy recipe!

Let’s break this recipe down to Four easy steps.

Step One – The Roux

I feel like roux for gumbo is a fabled creature whom many speak of but few encounter. There’s stories of constant whisking for hours while whispers of hands-off oven-roux seem too good to be true. Let me tell you friends of a new trick to save you time and agony – toasted flour. Yep – if you just add the flour to a dry dutch oven over medium heat, whisk it for about 8 minutes then add the oil, you’ll end up halfway to Rouxville. Placed a lid on the dutch oven and transfer it to a 400°F oven for 45 minutes checking on it after 30 minutes. If it’s not perfect milk chocolate colored after 45 minutes you might need to finish it on top of the stove for another 5-10 minutes. Still about an hour but there’s far less whisking. Which gives you time for food prep.

Step Two – Food Prep

I’d go as far to say that Homemade Shrimp Stock is the single most important part of this recipe. Buy two pounds of the best uncooked shrimp you can find – wild caught Gulf of Mexico Shrimp with heads is ideal. Place the peels and heads in a medium pot and set the shrimp aside. Add celery, onion, black peppercorns, a bay leaf, and 7 cups of water to the pot. Bring to a boil then reduce to a simmer for 20 minutes. Strain reserving broth and discarding everything else.
While the shrimp stock is stocking, prep your other ingredients. Finely dice celery, bell pepper, and onions. Slice the Andouille Sausage and Okra. That’s about it!

Note – In about an hour you’ve already made the best roux ever, shrimp stock from scratch, and prepped all your ingredients. Give yourself a high five! This recipe plays out really well. It would be great to cook with someone else or while entertaining guests.

Step Three – Make Gumbo

On your stove top you have a dutch oven with super hot roux (seriously, this stuff is lava) and homemade shrimp stock over low heat to keep warm. On your counter you have all your other ingredients prepped and ready for the gumbo. Add the celery, peppers, onion, and bay leaf to the roux and stir over medium heat until softened – about 20 minutes. Once the vegetables are softened add the aromatics, 5 cups of shrimp stock, and two cups of crushed tomatoes. Bring the sauce up to a low simmer then add the andouille and sliced okra. Heat this for another 20 minutes or so. If you’re serving all the gumbo right away you can add the shrimp about 5 minutes before serving. Otherwise, just add enough shrimp for each serving when you reheat it.

Step Four – There is no Step Four

I lied. Don’t forget the rice! While not actually part of this Gumbo recipe, I’d be remiss to exclude the rice. Rice is prepared with one part long grain rice, one and a half parts water, and a pinch of salt. RINSE the rice several times in cold water until it runs clear. Add rice, water, and salt to a pot and bring to a boil. Cover tightly and simmer on low heat for ten minutes or until rice is tender. Remove from heat, fluffy with fork, keep covered for ten minutes.

What is Gumbo?

I don’t know about you guys but I haven’t aways been clear on a few things surrounding ‘gumbo’. What’s the difference between Creole and Cajun? Is Okra mandatory? What about Jambalaya? In researching recipes for gumbo, I came across some answers I thought I’d share with you.

Creole vs. Cajun – Both Creole and Cajun gumbo generally have sausage and shrimp. Creole gumbo is mostly seafood with tomatoes. Cajun gumbo will generally have chicken in addition to shrimp.
A very simplified break down of the history – Creoles are people from French and Spanish colonization prior to the Louisiana purchase. Creoles also include other people native-born to Louisiana. Cajuns are the descendants of 17th century French speaking settlers of the area near Nova Scotia formally called Acadia. Acadians were expelled in the mid 18th century during France’s colonization of Canada.
This Shrimp and Andouille Gumbo is Creole-style.

Okra – There are three ways to thicken your gumbo Okra, Filé, and Roux.
Roux is a primary ingredient to gumbo. It should be as dark as possible, a few shades from burnt.
Filé (fee-lay) is a powder of ground sassafras leaves added to gumbo just before serving. It’s used as a thickener and to add earthiness to gumbo. “Kombo” is the Choctaw Indian word for filé and may be where the work Gumbo comes from. If filé is added too soon it becomes ropey and stringy. Filé also means ‘to become ropey’ in French.
Okra is also sometimes called Gumbo. In parts of Africa, “ki ngombo” is the word used to describe okra. But, the word you’re more likely interested in using to describe okra is mucilaginous. This gooeyness is what makes it a great thickener for gumbo.
Generally, either Filé or Roux are added to Gumbo as thickeners.

Jambalaya – In gumbo you make a roux, add the trinity, then stock followed by the meat. Gumbo is served with or over rice. Jambalaya is made by cooking the meat with the trinity then adding stock and rice to cook all in the same pot. Think of it more like a jamboree of everyone partying together!